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Full text of "Admission day celebration : souvenir and official program, September 4th-9th 1905, Sacramento, Cal."

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c/acramento,Cal. 

Jeptember 4t?to9t h J905 



UZA, . 



L-0^LO^ua> 



SOUVENIR 

AND OFFICIAL 

PROGRAM 




N. S. G. W 



H. S. CROCKER COMPANY 
SACRAM ENTO, CAL. 



ADMISSION DAY CELEBRATION 



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September 4th-9th 1905 V Sacramento, Cal. 







BOATING IS THE IDYLLIC RECREATION AT TAHOE, WITH SHELTERED COVES FOR IDLING HOURS 



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THE PRIDE OF CALIFORNIA 








Three hundred square miles of crystal clear water, six thousand two hundred and forty feet 
above the level of the sea, overshadowed by snow-crested Sierran peaks and fringed by heavy forests 
— such is lake Tahoe, largest and loveliest of mountain lakes, Californians have reason to be proud 
of this beautiful work of Nature, for nowhere is there anything of its kind with which it may be com- 
pared. ::::::::::::::: :::::::::::::: 

Surrounded by a dozen smaller lakes, in all of which is the best of fishing, and free from 
poison oak and snakes, this region is indeed the campers paradise. 

Lake Tahoe is easily reached. The Southern Pacific's Ogden Route connects at Truckee 
with the narrow gauge line of the Lake Tahoe Railway and Transportation Company, extending from 
Truckee to Tahoe City. The trip may be made in a few hours. ::::::::::: 



For particulars, illustrated folders, etc., see agent. : : : : : : : : SOUTHERN PACIFIC 




VACATION 



IS ISSUED ANNUALLY BY THE 



California Northwestern Railway 



f 



The Picturesque Route of California 

and is the standard publication on the Pacific Coast for 
information regarding 



MINERAL SPRINGS RESORTS, 


COUNTRY 


HOMES AND 


FARMS WHERE 


SUMMER 


BOARD 


E R 


S A R E 


TAKEN, A 


N D 


SELECT 


CAMPING : 


SPOTS 



This year's edition "Vacation 1905" contains 200 pages, beautifully 
Mlustrated, and is complete in its detailed information as to location, 
accommodations, attractions, etc., with terms from $7 per week up. 

To be had at Ticket Offices, 650 Market Street (Chronicle Building), and Tibu- 
ron Ferry, foot of Market Street; General Office, Mutual Life Building, corner 
Sansome and California Streets, San Francisco. :::::::::: 



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I 



APPLICATIONS BY MAIL WILL RECEIVE IMMEDIATE RESPONSE 
JAS. L. FRAZIER, Gen. Mgr. R. X. RYAN, Gen. Pass. Agt. 




THE SANTA FE 



Is the only line with its own track and train from 
the Golden Gate to Chicago. Oiled roadbeds, 
"no dust;" California Limited 3 days; Fred. 
Harvey's dining service; Grand Canyon of 
Arizona and Petrified Forests are special features. 
Elegant New Tourist Sleepers, and free reclining 
chair cars to Chicago daily without change. 
Personally conducted tourists excursions three 
times each week :::::::::: 



^^^r=n^m 








■ 


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Santa Te 

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Santa Fe 

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J. L. BLAIR, Gen. Agt. 

COR. 2d AND J STS., SACRAMENTO, CAL. 










1 






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The Native Sons of the Golden West 



A History of Its Organization 



mHE Order of the Native Sons of the Golden West, which 
to-day sends its members from all parts of California 
to celebrate in a fitting manner the 55th anniversary 
of the admission of their native State into the Union of 
States, owes its origin and progress to one of the 
strongest feelings implanted in the human breast — 
pride of Nativity, love for the place of birth. It is es- 
sentially and practically a California order, being con- 
fined to those born within the State. Its origin was patriotic, its pur- 
poses benevolent, its object to perpetuate the men and memories of "the 
days of '49," and to unite all native Californians in one harmionious body. 
It owes no allegiance save where the stars and stripes shall ever wave. 
The burden of the pioneer founders has been taken up ; and upon the 
foundation laid by them the Native Sons have erected a superstructure 
which to-day, in its ramifications, includes every city and hamlet of im- 
portance in the State of California. From a beginning of twenty-one 
members thirty years ago the nth of last July, it now numbers over 
seventeen thousand of the bone and sinew of the land, honored in their 
native State and in the Order. Of those early architects of the Order it 
can be truly said, "They builded better than they knew." 



CHAPTER I. 

<§b\?ttB of % (§ran 

THE object and aim of the Order of Native Sons of the Golden West 
is best told from the prefatory to its Constitution and By-laws : 
"The Society of the Native Sons of the Golden West was or- 
ganized for the mutual benefit, mutual improvement and social inter- 
course of its members ; to perpetuate in the minds of all native Cali- 
fornians the memories of one of the most wonderful epochs in the world's 
history, the days of 49' ; to unite them in one harmonious body through- 
out the State by the ties of a friendship mutually beneficial to all, and 
unalloyed by the bitterness of religious or political differences, the dis- 
cussion of which is most stringently forbidden in its meetings ; to ele- 
vate and cultivate the mental faculties ; to rejoice with one another in 
prosperity, and to extend the 'Good Samaritan' hand in adversity. The 
members must bear a good reputation for sobriety and industry ; they 
must follow some respectable calling by which to make a living; and. as 
a vital principle of the association, it encourages temperance among it.s 
members, and recommends total abstinence from all intoxicating drinks." 



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TELEPHONE AND 
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Is one of the Six Pioneer Independent Telephone 
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Automobile Supplies 
Photographic Goods 
Pocket Cutlery 

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THE BIG SPORTING GOODS HOUSE 
609 K Street, Sacramento, Cal. 



Light Machine Work and 
Repairing of all Kinds 



Hand Loaded Shells 
Gun Repainng 



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Wholesale Hardware, Mill, Mine 
and Blacksmith Supplies 

211 to 219 J Street 




THE 



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PIPE WORKS 

Manufacturers of Sheet Steel and Iron Pipe 
Works, 1 5th and B Streets 
Office, 219 J Street SACRAMENTO, CAL. 



L. W. NICKELL 



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TELEPHONE, VALE 9781 



Bicycles, Guns, Ammunition, 
Fishing Tackle. 
Photo Supplies, 
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Rented and Repaired 



AGENTS FOR 

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709-711 L STREET - - 



SACRAMENTO. CAL. 



The Grand Parlor was organized for the purpose of uniform adminis- 
tration of the privileges, honors and benefits of the order; to perpetuate 
in the minds of all native Californians the memories of "the days of '49," 
and to unite all worthy Native Sons of California in one harmionious 
body; improve the condition of its members by encouragement in busi- 
5S and in aiding them to obtain employment, and to extend to its mem- 
bers assistance in time of sickness and need. It has power over all Su- 
bordinate Parlors and to grant charters for the same, which it may re- 
voke or suspend for proper cause; of hearing and determining all appeals; 
to make governing laws for the Subordinate Parlors, and for furnishing 
all supplies necessary for the proper conduct of the business of the 
Order. 

The Constitution of the Order confines its membership to white 
males born in the State of California, and at least eighteen years of age; 
but Subordinate Parlors may fix the limit of age over eighteen years. 
Candidates must be of sound health, of good moral character and in- 
dustiious habits, having some respectable means of support, and believe 
in the existence of a Supreme Being. Application must be made in 
writing, signed by the applicant, stating time and place of birth, occupa- 
tion and residence ; and the applicant must be recommended by at least 
two members of the Order in good standing. The application is re- 
ferred to a committee of three (3) ; and if their report and the surgeon's 
certificate is favorable, the candidate is balloted for. The initiatory cere- 
monies are necessarily secret ; but they are founded on and bear an alle- 
gorical reference to the history of California, and are calculated to im- 
press the members with an idea of the importance to be attributed to the 
historical events that have made California what she is to-day. The 
principles of Friendship, Loyalty and Charity are enlarged upon, with 
the endeavor to instil into the members' minds the duty they owe to one 
another and to all worthy mankind. The amount of initiation fees and 
monthly dues of members varies in the different Parlors. The Constitu- 
tion of Subordinate Parlors fixes the minimum of initiation fee at $5. 
In many of the Parlors it is as high as $10 and $20. The monthly dues 
and amount of sick benefits are optional with each Parlor. The dues are 
generally $1 per month, and the sick benefits from $7 to $10 per week. 
Every member in good standing, in case of sickness or bodily injury, not 
arising from any immoral or unlawful act, is entitled to receive from the 



funds of the Parlor of which he is a member such weekly benefits as 
their by-laws provide, but in no case less than $5 per week. In case of the 
death of a member, there is allowed such sum as the by-laws may pro- 
vide for funeral expenses from $75 to $250. The growth and prosperity 
>.)[ the Order has been remarkable. It now numbers upward of 17,000 
members, distributed in 200 Subordinate Parlors. Taking into considera- 
tion that it is but the first generation of native Californians, there is 
every reason to be proud of this success. Inseparably linked with the 
destinies of the State, it will live to see California attain the full fruition 
of her power and greatness. 

DURING the preparations incidental to the celebration of the Fourth 
of July, 1875, there appeared in the advertising columns of the daily 
press, on the morning of June 24th, an invitation to the native sons 
of San Francisco, over fourteen years of age, to meet in the Police Court- 
room, Tuesday night, June 29th, and organize for the purpose of taking 
part in the celebration of the national holiday. This public notice was 
the means of bringing together the young men who conceived and car- 
ried into execution the formation of the Order of the Native Sons of the 
Golden West. In accordance with the call, a small but enthusiastic body 
met and organized for the purpose of taking part in the parade, and 
further decided to perpetuate the organization under the name of the 
"Native Sons of the Golden State." A number of those present, who 
were under sixteen years of age, were debarred by vote from participat- 
ing. The meeting adjourned to meet again in the Twelfth District 
Courtroom on July 1, 1875. The minutes of the first meeting of the 
society were, at a meeting held October 7, 1875, corrected by the Execu- 
tive Committee to read as follows : "The first meeting was held in the 
Police Courtroom, and was called to order by General A. M. Winn, who 
briefly stated the objects and purposes of the meeting. He then offered 
the following resolution, which was unanimously adopted : 'Resolved, 
That the Native Sons of the Golden West will form an association to be 
known by that name and to be perpetuated on the Pacific Coast, and that 
we now appoint a committee to prepare a Constitution and By-laws for 
such an institution ; and, when ready to report, they shall call a public 
meeting of the Native Sons over seventeen years of age to consider and 
act on them.' " For the first two or three meetings there was a confu- 
sion of ideas and purposes, due in the main to the youth and inexperience 



OLD FORT SUTTER 

The Stronghold For The Early Settlers 




REAL ESTATE 
DEALERS 



1st Vice=Pres. 

Geo. J. Bryte 

2nd Vice-Pres. 

E. A. Nicolaus 

Cashier, 

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A stronghold For The Present Population 



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1015 FOURTH STREET 

— Real Estate Headquarters 



MONEY 
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RENTS 
COLLECTED 





HEA DQUARTERS OF THE FOLLOWING PARLORS 

The following parlors have secured headquarters and will keep "open house" in this city : 

Precita Parlor, San Francisco, Armory Hall; Mission Parlor, San Francis 



isco, Elk's Hall; 




KLEINSORGE & HEILBRON 



OTTO L. HEILBRON 
C. E. KLEINSORE 



Sunset, Vale 8091 
Capital 348 



Real Estate and Insurance 

COLLECTION OF RENTS A SPECIALTY 
MONEY LOANED 



Orient Insurance Co. 
Hanover Fire Insurance C< 



605 J Street, Sacramento 



DIRECTORS 

£ E ? E £ ""P RO «T- H . HA VVI.KY 

J. C, OAH1Y 



E. L. HAWK 



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Sacramento. 



of those participating. At this date there were but 295 persons of Cali- 
fornia birth enrolled upon the Great Register of voters for the City and 
County of San Francisco. It is not, therefore, a matter of surprise that 
the participants were few and inexperienced. It has always been a mat- 
ter of uncertainty as to who were present at the first meeting; but as it 
was decided to allow none under sixteen years of age to take part in 
the proceedings, and as the records show that most of those present and 
ill the parade were under sixteen years of age, it will readily be under- 
stood that amongst them were a number who subsequently joined the 
( )rder and are qualified to speak with a knowledge of this first meeting. 
The meetings held July 1st, 2d and 4th were important only in showing 
the spirit and patriotism of the attendants, and the businesslike manner 
in which the details of the coming celebration were managed. Mr. Henry 
R. Reed offered the use of a large silk American flag, to be carried by the 
Native Sons in the procession; and amongst the insignia of a disbanded 
club in a room in Anthony's Hall Avas found a stuffed bear, a cub about 
three feet long, much dilapidated but still a bear. This historic emblem 
was proudly paraded, decked in red, white and blue ribbons, and flanked 
1>\ the American and Bear flags. 

Paul Harmon procured a piece of canvas, and, being something of an 
amateur artist, painted upon it the rude picture of a bear, after the copy 
of the original Bear flag now in the possession of the Society of California 
Pioneers in San Francisco. This flag is now the property of California 
Parlor. No. 1, and is a most treasured relic. 

THE FOURTH OF JULY, 1875. 

On Monday, July 5th, 1875 (the 4th falling on Sunday), the Native 
Sons formed the Ninth Division of the procession, acting as escort to the 
children's decorated car. Many of them were attired in tattered miners' 
costumes, and carried on their shoulders the implements of California's 
early industry, the pick and shovel. These, with the Bear flag and bear, 
have ever since been regarded as the emblems of the Order. 

THE NATIVE SONS OF THE GOLDEN WEST. 

The next meeting was held on Sunday, July 11, 1875; and from this 
meeting dates the entry of the Order into the ranks of patriotic, benevo- 
lent and fraternal societies. The name of the Native Sons of the Golden 



State was changed to the Native Sons of the Golden West, a Constitu- 
tion and By-laws adopted, and regular officers elected to hold office until 
the nth day of January, 1876. 

General A. M. Winn, who conceived the idea of the formation of the 
Society, drafted the Constitution and By-laws, afterwards organizing the 
Parliamentary School, serving for six months as its presiding officer, and 
lent invaluable aid to the youthful Society, was elected an honorary mem- 
ber. General Winn and G. W. Anthony, elected September 5, 1875.. 
were the only honorary members elected in the Order. The amendment 
to the By-laws, adopted August 15th, 1875, providing that donations 
made for honorary membership shall not be less than one hundred dol- 
lars, which entitled the person to life membership without dues, together 
with Sec. 2 of Article II of the Constitution, providing for honorary mem- 
bership other than the foregoing, was stricken out at a meeting of the 
Society held in Red Men's Hall, April 26, 1876, G. W. Anthony resigning 
the same night. After perfecting the organization of the N. S. G. W. 
the enthusiasm of its members did not wane ; and they went to work in a 
business manner to perfect their Society. A committe to prepare an ini- 
tiatory ceremony and obligation, after the plan of other fraternal Societies 
was appointed. The report of the committee was adopted, and all the 
members present took the obligation at the meeting held August 1, 1875. 
Provisions were also made for the care of the sick and burial of the 
dead. The first sick committee was appointed on the night of July 25, 
1875, as was also the first 9th of September committee, to arrange for 
properly celebrating the admission of the State of California into the 
Union. An order of business was approved, and each member advised J 
to procure and study a copy/ of Cnshing's Manual. A badge of the seal 
of the State, in gold on white satin, surrounded by a rosette of red. white 
and blue, was accepted. The guileless youths also appointed a special 
committee of two to suggest or hint to the young ladies the advisability 
of presenting a flag to the Society. 

The youthful Society thus early foreshadowed its future greatness b) 
the adoption of a resolution providing for the organization of branches I 
in towns and cities west of the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Weekly J 
meetings were held, and new members kept coming in. At the meeting 
of August 29th, 1875, it was decided to parade on the 9th of September 
with Alpine hat, with a star and feather, blue sash for privates. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



PORTLAND, ORE, 



SACRAMENTO, CAL. 



SAN JOSE, CAL. 



WATERHOUSE & LESTER 





WAGONMAKERS', BLACKSMITHS', HORSESHOERS' AND TRIMMERS' 














SUPPLIES AND MANUFACTURERS OF WHEELS, TOPS BODIES, Etc. 













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Our Motto: "EVERYTHING FIRST-CLASS" 



The Largest Stock of Electrical Supplies 
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The Society met at their hall on the morning of September 9th, 1875, 
and gaily appareled in their new regalias, with flags flying and old Bruin 
held proudly aloft leading the van, marched through the principal streets 
of the city, escorted by the French Zouaves to Woodward's Gardens, 
where an interesting literary and musical program was enjoyed. Danc- 
ing concluded the day's festivities. A silk flag was presented to the 
Society by Miss Nellie Fenn on behalf of the Native Daughters. Presi- 
dent John A. Steinbach received the flag in a few well chosen remarks. 

I reneral A. M. Winn, in an eloquent speech, thanked the French 
Zouaves, referring to revolutionary times, and closing said: "Since then 
nearly a century has passed ; and now upon this far-off shore, you, as 
the proud representatives of the French nation, have kindly escorted the 
Native Sons of the Golden West in the celebration of the twenty-fifth 
anniversary of our admission into these United States. We can imagine 
with pleasure the spirits of Washington and Lafayette hovering over 
us with delight, witnessing their decendants honoring each other and 
linking together the emblems of their respective nations." 

A Parliamentary School was organized October 8, 1875, and General 
Winn presided over the class for six months, during which time several 
oi them had become very efficient in presiding and debate. John E. Mc- 
Dougald. whom General Wynn described as a "young man, bright and 
intelligent, about twenty-two years of age," succeeded to the Presidency, 
and ably conducted their deliberations up to the time the school dis- 
solved. 

As early as September 16, 1875, the Society took action on an appli- 
cation from Nevada by resolving that, "We advise State organizations, 
and unite by representation, and recommend the formation of Societies 
of Native Sons in all States and Territories, and that the Trustees be 
authorized to promote the same by furnishing printed copies of the Con- 
stitution, By-laws and Ritual." 

The designation of the Society as a Parlor was made in September, 
1875. The selection of the name at the time seemed to bear no further 
significance than to have something original, in contradistinction to lodge, 
chapter, etc., as used in other fraternal organizations ; though it is not un- 
likely it may have been suggested from the French parlez, to speak, being 
applied in its primary sense to a place of meeting for the purposes of 
social conversation. 



The age of admission was changed, on the 18th of November, from 
sixteen to eighteen years, and, though subsequently changed for a short 
time to twenty years, has been a part of the Constitution of Subordinate 
Parlors for years and is liable to remain so for an indefinite time. At 
the same meeting a declaration of principles was also adopted. 

The success of the Native Sons of the Golden West, in San Francisco 
led to inquiries from Marysville and Stanislaus, relative to the formation 
of branches ; and it was resolved that after the 7th of January, 1876, the 
Society publish a pamphlet containing the Constitution, By-laws and 
Order of Busines_s, together with the names, residences and occupations 
of all members of the Society. 

The first semi-annual election of officers was held on the night of 
January 6, 1876. 

The Secretary reported an active membership of ninety-six, with 
cash on hand amounting to one hundred and thirty-two dollars and fortv 
cents. The place of meeting was changed to Red Men's Hall, a new and 
commodious hall just completed, fronting Union Square, on Post street ; 
and here the installation took place on Tuesday evening, January 13, 1876. 

Under President Fishbourne's administration the work went on ; 
and the Society grew in numbers and popularity. The many friends of 
the youthful organization showed their appreciation by numerous pre- 
sentations. The "Alta California" had always been a w-arm and consis- 
tent supporter of the Society; and at the meeting on April 6, 1876, in the 
presence of a large number of invited guests, General Winn on behalf 
of Messrs. Fred'k MacCrelish and Wm. A. Woodward, publishers and 
proprietors of the "Alta California," presented the Society with its 
charter. Pictures of General Winn and Daniel McLaren, as President 
and Secretary of the first Odd Fellows' Association which met in the 
State, were presented to the Society in the month of February, together 
with a unique frame carved by F. V. Hart, a member of the Society. 
The design was a grapevine in full bearing running down the sides of 
the frame ; and on the top of the frame in lighter wood, was the figure 
of a bear, and at its bottom the figures 1846-1876. This frame now 
encloses the charter of California Parlor No. 1. 

In March, 1876, the Society was duly incorporated as the Native 
Sons of the Golden West, and legally entered upon its fraternal career. 
The report of the retiring officers showed a membership of 118, with 



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HEADQUARTERS OF THE FOLLOWING PARLORS. 

Napa Parlor, Firemen's Hall; Presidio Parlor, San Francisco, Grangers' Hall; Dolores Parlor, 
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oasli on hand amounting to $184.79. T ne receipts of the term amounted 
to $584.54. the expenditures being $531.94. 

Under President McDougald's guidance, the Order continued to pros- 
per; and it was due in the main to his wise and conservative action that 
the Order was continued in the path marked out for it by its founders; 
for questions arose that at one time threatened to be very serious, grow- 
ing out of the striking off of the name of General Winn from the roll and 
giving publicity to the fact that he was no longer a member of the 
Order. This action of the Society was due to a constitutional amend- 
ment, adopted April 26, 1876, prohibiting honorary membership. Gen- 
eral Winn continued a warm friend of the Order of which he still con- 
sidered himself a member. At his death the funeral was under the 
auspices of the Order. His resting place at Sacramento is marked by a 
massive granite monument erected by the N. S. G. W. 

The Fourth of July of that year was fittingly celebrated, the mem- 
bers then adopting the bear as their emblem and badge. They also pa- 
raded at the funeral of James Lick, adopted a design for a seal and took 
a benefit at the old California Theater, which netted a handsome sum. 
At the close of the term the Society numbered 122 members, with cash 
on hand amounting to $303.61. 

President Whepley was succeeded July 5, 1877, by G. H. Fairchild ; 
and it was during his term the order met its first reverse and passed 
through dark financial days, which, however were not sufficient to quell 
their ardor. It was on the eighth day of October, 1877, that the Pioneer 
Land and Loan Bank, of which J. C. Duncan was manager, suspended 
payment ; and by that failure the Society lost the whole of its accumulated 
funds, amounting to $1153. This disaster was the more felt in that on 
the same day Lyle Pitts, one of the members of the Society, was drowned 



in the Sacramento River, and the Society was at an expense of $200 in 
recovering his body and paying the subsequent funeral expenses, which 
had to be met by an assessment on its members. Up to December, 1877, 
the original San Francisco Society constituted the entire Order. On De- 
cember 17, 1877, application was made by native Californians residing in 
Oakland ; and they were organized as a branch parlor by the mother So- 
ciety under the name of Oakland Parlor, No. 2. This was followed by 
the inauguration of Parlor No. 3 at Sacramento on March 22, 1878. The 
institution of these branch Parlors rendered it necessary for the San 
Francisco Parlor to adopt some distinctive name ; and it selected the name 
of Charter Parlor, No. 1, by which it was designated until June 1, 1878, 
when it adopted the name by which it has since been known — California 
Parlor, No. 1. For some time afterwards each Parlor retained its in- 
dividuality; and, though working under the same ritual and using the 
same ceremonies, each practically claimed entire independence. Al- 
though no serious difficulty arose from this condition of affairs, it was 
seen that, as the Order was extended, conditions would arise and circum- 
stances demand a concert of action by which there should be some su- 
preme governing power to make general laws for the regulation of all 
branches, and to which an appeal could be taken in cases of differences 
between Parlors or amongst their members. California Parlor, No. 1, 
as Charter Parlor, claimed this authority, but was without the power to 
enforce it. It was arranged to hold a conference of delegates, composed 
of five repersentatives from each Parlor, to meet at San Francisco, No- 
vember 29, 1878. The delegates met and formed the first Grand Parlor of 
the Native Sons of the Golden West. The Grand Parlor has -since con- 
vened annually ; and the records of its proceedings furnish the further 
history of the Order. 






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Is Old and Pure 



FRANCISCAN MISSIONS OF CALIFORNIA 



By Hon. Joseph R. Knowland. 



President California Historic Landmarks League, and Chairman 
Landmarks Committee, Grand Parlor, Native Sons of the Golden West: 
The remains of the old Spanish missions recall a most interesting period 
of California's picturesque and romantic history. It is impossible to view 
these beautiful ruins and fail to become keenly interested in the story of 
the establishment of the twenty-one Franciscan missions, stretching 
from San Diego in the south to Sonoma in the north. The Franciscan 
missionaries were the original pioneers of California, sowing the first 
seeds of civilization and establishing the first permanent settlements. 

It was in the year 1769 at San Diego that the first mission was es- 
tablished. Monterey was the next spot selected. Thus the work con- 
tinued until a chain of missions had been established, located in such 
proximity that a traveler could start on foot from San Diego and nightly 
enjoy the hospitality of a different mission until Sonoma was reached. 
San Francisco Solano (Sonoma) mission was the last to be founded, 
1823 being the date of its establishment. 

Of the original twenty-one mission establishments there to-day re- 
mains ruins of nineteen. Every vestige of Santa Cruz and San Rafael 
missions have disappeared. A few crumbling walls mark the spot where 
once stood Soledad mission. The rains of successive winters beat down 
upon the exposed adobe walls, and the day is not far distant when even 
these walls will entirely disappear. San Diego, the mother mission, is in 
poor State of preservation. An unsightly Indian school now adjoins 
these ruins. La Purisima, five miles from the town of Lompoc, in Santa 
Barbara County, is a hopeless ruin. San Francisco Solano mission at 
Sonoma is in need of immediate attention, but as the remaining build- 
ings and surrounding grounds have recently been purchased by popular 
subscription and turned over to the State of California, the future restora- 
tion of this mission is assured. One of the most beautiful and less fre- 
quently visited missions is located in Monterey County, twenty-six miles 
from King City. This is mission San Antonio de Padua, a most pic- 
turesque ruin. Formerly one of the largest and most beautiful of the 
mission establishments, it was fast crumbling to dust. The roof of the 
imposing chapel had fallen and the rains of each winter were disinter- 
cirating the adobe walls. The interesting ruins cover several acres of 



ground. The California Historic Landmarks League is determined to 
save this mission, and has already expended the sum of $1200 in re- 
building the walls and re-roofing the chapel. Owing to a lack of funds 
work has been temporarily suspended. At San Luis Rey the chapel is in 
good state of preservation, but the arches, of which there were originally 
thirty-two, ornamented with latticed railings, which supported the long 
corridor, are year by year crumbling. At San Juan Capistrano the chapel 
was years ago destroyed by an earthquake, but a number of other build- 
ings remain. San Gabriel mission, ten miles from the city of Los An- 
geles, is in use, services being held wdthin this old structure every Sun- 
day. Twenty miles north from Los Angeles stand the remaining build- 
ings belonging to San Fernando Rey. The chapel is filled with hay; the 
long building with the arched corridor serves as a boarding-house for the 
farm hands. The Southern California Landmarks Club has re-roofed the 
chapel. Santa Barbara and San Buena A^entura missions are in a very sat- 
isfactory state of preservation. This is likewise the case with Santa 
Ynez, in Santa Barbara County. The missions of San Luis Obispo and 
San Juan Bautista, located respectively in San Luis Obispo and San Juan, 
San Benito County, have been disfigured by the erection of modern 
church steeples. What little remains of Santa Clara mission has been 
modernized. The mission near the old town of Monterey, San Carlos 
Borromeo, has been restored with a vengeance, a peaked shingle roof de- 
stroying, to a great extent, the original beauty of this structure. Little 
remains of mission San Jose. The old mission of San Miguel, in the town 
of like name, is most interesting, the interior of the church still showing 
the decorations made by the Indians. San Francisco de Asis (Dolores') 
mission, in San Francisco, with the modern church structure adjoining, 
strikingly contrasts the past with the present. 

These old missions should be preserved. Over one hundred years 
have come and gone since the death of the old mission system, and each 
year, Californians are becoming more impressed with the importance of 
preserving these reminders of the days when Spain ruled this territory. 
They should stand as monuments to those self-sacrificing padres who 
labored unceasingly for the betterment of the Indians, facing the greatest 
difficulties, enduring hardships, and in many instances sacrificing their 
lives. 



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HEADQUARTERS FOR THE FOLLOWING PARLORS. 



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ppgB, Smoker 'b Article 

Walking Canes, Cutlery, Notions, Stationery, Etc. 
535 MARKET STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 




I 



SAN ANTONIO DF. PADUA, MONTEREY COUNTY, 
Founded July 14, 1771. 




SAN CARLOS BORROMEO (CARMEL) MISSION, MONTEREY COUNTY, 
Founded Juue 3, 1770, 




SANTA BARBARA, SANTA BARBARA COUNTY 
Founded December 4, 17S6. 




SAN LUIS OBISPO DE TOLOSA.SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY 
Founded September 1, 1772. 



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SAN FKKXANDO REY DE ESPANA, I.OS ANGELES COUNTY 
Founded September 8, 1797 



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SAX RAFAEL ARCANGEL. MARIN COUNTY 
Founded December 18, 1817 




SAN BUENAVENTURA, VENTURA COUNTY 
Founded March 31, 1782 




SANTA CRUZ, SANTA CRUZ COUNTY 
Founded August 28, 170: 




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HEADQUARTERS OF THE FOLLOWING: PARLORS: 

Sequoia Parlor, San Francisco, Gormley's Hall; California Parlor, San Francisco, Senate Chamber, 
State Capitol; McCloud Parlor, Redding, New Pavilion; National Parlor, San Francisco, Haub's Hall; 
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Robt. Wieneke 



Golden West Hotel 

N. E. Cor. Ellis and Powell 
SAN FRANCSICO, CAL. 

Special Rates by the Week or Month 
The Leading Hotel in San Francisco, Cal 

New fireproof brick buildings, containing 350 
handsomely furnished rooms with all modern im- 
provements. Centrally located. 

RATES 
American Plan from $1.25 to $2.50 Per Day 
European Plan from 50c to $2.50 Per Day 

Rooms with Bath. Elevator 
Telephone Main 5358 

WIENEKE & PLAGEMANN 



WE KINDLY CALL YOUR ATTENTION TO OUR 



Twentieth Century Clothes Shop 

:: :: :: :: FOR MEN AND YOUTHS :: :: :: 



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We do not herald our clothing as being the 
' 'Only Best" — as we are catering only to the trade 
of an enlightened public. We carry the very best 
wearing apparel for males that is produced by the 
best manufacturers of the country — others can do so 
equally as well — but do they ? 

If you are conscientious critics, we are willing to 
leave the solution of the question to you. 



201 and 203 Kearney St 
200 and 202 Sutter St. 



Alfred Lilienfeld & Co., San Francisco. 




SAN FRANCISCO SOLANO, SONOMA COUNTY 
Founded August 25 ,1823 




LA PURISIMA CONCEPCION SANTA BARBARA COUNTY 
Founded December 8, 1787 




SANTA YNEZ, SANTA BARBARA COUNTY 
Founded September 17. 1804 




SAN MIGUEL ARCANGEL. SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY 
Founded July 25, 1797 




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REPEATING ARMS COMPANY 









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EUREKA STOVES AND RANGES 

Adapted for burning COAL, WOOD, GASOLINE, OIL, GAS, 
Headquarters for all kinds of heating apparatus, Mantels, Tiles, Grates. 




EUREKA RANGES ARE THE BEST 



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SAN GABRIEL ARCAXGEL, LOS ANUELES COUNTY 
Founded September 8, 1771 





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SAX JUAN CAPISTRANO, ORANGE COUNTY 
Founded November 1, 1776 




SAN FRANCISCO DE ASIS (DOLORES) SAN FRANCISCO 
Founded October 9, 17; 6 




SANTA CLARA, SANTA CLARA COUNTY 
Founded January 18. 1777 



AMERICAN FENCE American 



We Guarantee it. 

Weighs more to the running rod than any fence manu- 
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of superiority ol our ience over all others. When you 
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terests and at least examine the AMERICAN. Compare 
it with all others on the market ; we will abide by the 
results of the comparison. 

There is a responsible dealer in every town handling 
American Fence— hunt him up, and he will show you the 
fence of responsibility, the fence that lasts, the fence that 
will look well, the Ience that will hold, the fence that w 
turn everything, except wind and water. 

We have a Fence Book that tells a lot of things you 
should know about a good Woven Wire Fence 



wovTn fences 

HOGS, SHEEP, CATTLE 



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12 IN. OR 6 IN. 

APART 

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EVERY ROD GUARANTEED 

It tells how to chose the best : it tells how to put up a fence ; 
it gives you details as to the kind and size you should buy for all purposes-and a lot of other things that are 
important. 



By nil means drop vs a line and get this book. 
It is free on request. Write today. 



AMERICAN STEEL & WIRE CO. 



SAIN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



ELLWOOD FENCE ELLWCCD woven fences 



Well fenced farms pay big profits 



HOGS, SHEEP, CATTLE, POULTRY 

58 INCH 



50 INCH 



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The Ellwood is one ot the oldest and certainly one of 
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tested and is highly recommended by the thousands of 
farmers, ranchmen, fruit growers and stock raisers who 
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SPECIAL FEATURES 

STRONG-Because of the large, strong cables, com- 
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GALVA.SnZING— Wire thoroughly galvanized before ALL STYLES MADE IN SIX HEIGHTS " 

weaving, rendered thereby weatherproof. EVERY ROD GUARANTEED 

ELASTICITY— Elasticity amply sufficient to provide for all uecessary expansion and contraction under 
varying temperature. 

ADJUSTABILITY — Easily adjusted and erected to fit the irregularity of the ground. 

Made in six (G) styles for all purposes. 
11 rite for special catalogue. 

THE THOMSON=DIGGS COMPANY, Distributers 

SACRAMENTO, CAL. 




HEADQUARTERS OF THE FOLLOWING PARLORS: 

Twin Peaks Parlor, San Francisco, New Pavilion; Niantic Parlor, San Francisco, State Treasurer's 
office, State Capitol; El Capitan Parlor, San Francisco, State Printer's office, State Capitol; 
Halcyon Parlor, San Francisco, Golden Eagle Hotel; Las Lomas Parlor, N. D. G. W., 



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SAN LUIS REY DE FRANCIA, SAN DIEGO COUNTY, 
Founded June 13, 1798 




SAN JOSE, ALAMEDA COUNTY, 
Founded June II, 1797. 




SANIJUAN BAUTISTA, MONTEREY COUNTY, 
Founded June 2q, 1797. 




LA SOLEDAD, MONTEREY COUNTY, 
Founded October 9, 1791. 






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IVER JOHNSON BICYCLES 



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DAMASCUS: CUTLERY 




The Best Cutlery in the World 



1 1 J>vM!; ^^JX? ) ^>>33S ) 1^>vJ», 






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I'm a native of Missouri — my life is limited, but 
I'm going to enjoy it while I do live." 

HALL, LUHRS & CO. 



WHOLESALE : GROCERS 

SACRAMENTO, - CALIFORNIA 



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EARLY CAPITOLS OF CALIFORNIA 








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CAPITOL AT MONTEREY — 1849 



CAPITOL AT SAN JOSE — 1849-1851 




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CAPITOL AT VALLEJO — 1852-1853 



CAPITOL AT BENICIA — 1853-54 



Phoenix 

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Phoenix milling Company, manufacturers 

Sacramento, California 




422 K 

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Sacramento, 

California 



F0TOGRAFER 



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SUNSET, OAK 421 



MEALS 25 CENTS 



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M. A. HOWARD, Proprietor 

All Tenth, P, and M Street Cars 
Pass the Door 



918 K STREET 



SACRAMENTO, CAL. 



MATT KENNEDY 



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Phones : Capital 371 

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"$ $ W f Green trading Stamps 



THE FIRST TWO CAPITOLS AT SACRAMENTO 




CAPITOL AT SACRAMENTO 1852-1854 



The first Courthouse that was erected at Seventh and I streets, in 
Sacramento City, and in which the sessions of 1852 and 1854 were held, 
was commenced in June, 1850, and completed December 24, 185 1. It was 
destroyed in the great fire of July 13, 1854, which consumed a large por- 
tion of the business part of the city. On the 14th the "Democratic State 
Journal" gave the following as one of the incidents connected with the 
destruction of the Courthouse : 

"Patriotic. — When the fire threatened the Courthouse with destruc- 
tion, the Governor (Bigler), who was present, and who had been work- 
ing from the commencement of the fire wherever Sacramento most needed 
a soldier, asked those present to assist him in saving the furniture. To 
this many objected, on the ground that private parties, who could not 
suffer the loss as well as the county, needed their services. A full-length 
portrait of Washington was standing against the southern wall, and 
pointing to it, the Governor said, 'See, there is the portrait of the father 
of your country; will you permit it to be destroyed?' when a general rush 
was made for the portrait, and it was saved." The portrait now hangs in 
the Senate Chamber. 




CAPITOL AT SACRAMENTO 1855-1869 



Immediately after the fire a contract was entered into between 
Toseph Nougues and the county officers for the erection of the present 
Courthouse. As originally arranged, the building answered the follow- 
ing description: Extreme height, 61 feet; dimensions, 80 by 120 feet; 
with a portico supported by ten pillars, 3 feet 6 inches in diameter by 31 
feet 6 inches in height. The ground floor was devoted to a county prison. 
On the same floor were two separate offices containing fire-proof vaults, 
and occupied by the State Controller and State Treasurer. The second 
floor was devoted to a Senate Chamber, 57 by 30 feet, and an Assembly 
room, 72 feet 8 inches by 41 feet 4 inches, together with nine rooms for 
clerks and officers of the Legislature. The style of architecture is Ionic. 
The original contract price was $100,600, and the subsequent contracts 
made the total cost of the building to the county $240,000. The corner- 
stone was laid September 27, 1854, with Masonic honors, and the brick 
work was completed November 9th following. The building was finished 
January 1, 1855. It was rented to the State for capitol purposes at an 
annual rental of $12,000, and was used for that purpose from 1855 until 
the completion of the present capitol. 



Schilling's Best 

Greetings 



SACRAMENTO 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Baker & 
Hamilton 



LOS ANGELES 



NEW YORK 




HEADQUARTERS OF THE FOLLOWING PARLORS: 

San Francisco, Colonial; Palo Alto Parlor, San Jose Parlor, Observatory Parlor; (San Jose) and 
Vendome Parlor, N. D. G. W. (San Jose), New Pavilion; Rincon Parlor, San Francisco, 



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SAN FRANCISCO 

MANUFACTURERS AND DEALERS IN 

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2Q=31 Battery Street San Francisco, Cat. 




THE DISCOVERY OF GOLD 



BY WINFIELD J DAVIS 




MARSHALL'S 



While it is absolutely true that there had been discoveries of gold 
in California many years before, the credit of its practical discovery is 
due to James W. Marshall, and that was by a mere accident. However, 
it should not be understood that there is disposition to detract from the 
credit that is justly due him. Marshall was a native of New Jersey, and 
was born October 8, 1810. On arriving at man's estate he removed to 
Indiana, afterwards Illinois and Missouri and arrived in California in 
1844. He entered the employment of Captain Sutter at the Fort a year 
later, and in 1846 was an active participant in the California Revolution — 
the "Bear Flag War" as it may be called. Returning to Sutter's Fort 
he again entered the employment of the famous pioneer whose name is 
so intimately connected with the history of California, and it was in 
the course of that employment that the important discovery was made 
that, indeed, changed the geography of the world. Marshall, as about 
all who made important discoveries or inventions, passed his declining 



years in poverty, and about 5 o'clock on the morning of August 10, 1885, 
he was found dead in his cabin within almost a stone's throw of the place 
where he had picked up the first gold nugget that gave to California the 
entitlement of the Golden State ; that resulted in the building up of a giant 
commonwealth on the shores of the Pacific ; that created a State whose 
development has been unparalleled, and the perfected realization is yet 
to come. The narrative of Marshall himself, of the discovery of gold is 
briefly as follows : It is carried to us from his dictation to his biog- 
rapher, George Frederic Parsons, who for many years was the Town 
Editor of the "Record-Union" of this city. California had come into 
the possession of the United States : Marshall returned to Sutter's Fort 
from his campaign with the revolutionary party in the southern part of 
the State. He suggested to Sutter the advisability of establishing a saw 
mill, and with an Indian interpreter set out to examine the country 
around. His quest ultimated at Coloma. Here the American River 
flowed through a narrow valley and was hemmed in by precipitious 
hills. It afforded an ideal site for water power. It was in June. 1847. 
that Marshall began the construction of the saw mill at Coloma. We 
now approach the most important event, not only in the life of Marshall, 
but in the history of California and the world. In January. 1848. in the 
morning, Marshall went out to superintend the work of the men under 
his charge, and after closing the fore-bay gate and thus shutting off 
the water, he walked clown the tail-race to see what sand and gravel 
had been removed during the night. On this particular morning he 
strolled to the lower end of the race and stood for a moment examining 
the mass of debris that had been washed down, and at this junction his 
eye caught the glimmer of something that laid lodged in a crevice, on a 
ripple of soft granite, some six inches under the clear water. He stooped 
and picked up the substance ; it was heavy, of a peculiar color, and un- 
like anything he had seen in the stream before. For a few minutes he 
held it in his hand reflecting, and endeavoring to recall all that he had 
heard or read concerning the various minerals. After a close examina- 
tion he became satisfied that what he held in his hand must be one of 
three substances — mica, sulphurets of copper, or gold. The weight as- 
sured him that it was not mica. Could it be sulphurets of copper? He 
remembered that that mineral is brittle, and that gold is malleable, and 
as this thought passed through his mind he placed the specimen upon 1 
flat stone and tested it by striking it with another. The substance did 
not crack or flake off; it simply bent under the blows. This. then, was 
gold, and in this way was the first practical discoverv of gold made in 
California. 



C. SCHNERR & CO. 



CAPITAL SODA WORKS 



Iron Brew, Sarsaparilla, Iron and Vichy Water, Orange 
Cider, Champagne Cider 



CROWN SODA 



3 1 K Street, :::::: Sacramento, Cal. 



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PACIFIC COAST AGENTS, SACRAMENTO 



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SUTTER'S FORT 




By Courtesy of The Wednesday Press 



SUTTER'S FORT 



Destiny of nations has often been determined by the unconscious act 
of a man. In 1839, J onn A. Sutter adventured up the Sacramento River 
and landed near the point where the American River joins the Sacra- 
mento. Three miles out he established the Fort that bears his name and 
that then was the farthest western fortification on the hemisphere. Sut- 
ter was a Swiss by birth ; born in the Grand Duchy of Baden, February 
28, 1803. There he was reared and educated. To his credit it may be 
remarked that he spoke and wrote fluently four languages. In his early 



life he developed a spirit of adventure, entered the military service of 
France as Captain under Charles X., and there remained until he arrived 
at the age of thirty. He arrived in New York in 1834. His object was to 
prepare the way for a colony of his countrymen in the West, and he 
located in Missouri. From there he made a journey of exploration to 
New Mexico, and here is the secret of his later settling in the Sacra- 
mento Valley, and the important results that flowed from it. He en- 
countered trappers who had crossed to the Pacific Coast, and from tliem 



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EL SYMPHONIE" 

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SUPERIOR QUALITY AND EXCELLENCE 




S. B. KORN. Pacific Coast Representative 



124 California Street, San Francisco 





Jonas Schoenfeld & Company 

Importers and Dealers in 

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516-518 Washington St. 



San Francisco, California 



Imperials Cigarettes 



ARE 



"Native Sons 



99 



GEO. D. GRAHAM 

Manufacturer of Printing and Lithog'rapHic 

INKS 

Printers' Rollers and Composition 

561=567 Commercial St., San Francisco 



Telephone, Main 240 



[earned that in a country then almost unknown to the general world there 
existed a Fertile region in the north of California; one that but awaited 
the adding oi the energy of man to that which a generous nature had 
already contributed. 

He procured a grant from the .Mexican Governor of California that 
covered a number of leagues of land, but they were so indefinitely de- 
scribed that it was not until 1866 that the courts of our country finally 
determined the status. He landed with his men at about the foot of I 
street, as it now is in this city, on August 16, 1839, an d immediately com- 
menced the construction of his Fort. It was built of adobe and on its 
walls were mounted ship-cannon, formidable in those days, but that now 
would be but a jeer. He reduced the Indians to subjection and taught 
them agriculture and manufacturing. It was on the site of the City of 
Sacramento that he planted his wheat field — the first in the Sacramento 
Valley; here it was that he planted grapevines and fruit trees. At the 
Fort he established various lines of manufactures. His foresight was in- 
deed, wonderful. So far back as the very early forties he recognized the 
value of the water power of the swift-flowing American River and con- 
structed at Brighton a saw-mill to be run by the harnessed waters of that 
stream. There was for a time an era of prosperity; he was indeed the 
master of all that he surveyed and one able to hold his own with the 
"•overnmental authority— Mexico ; to trade with and acquire the Rus- 
sian possessions in Sonoma County; he maintained absolute dominion 
over the native tribes. 

An incident occurred in 1846, that had much to do with the 
acquisition of California by the United States. It was what is 
commonly known as the Bear Flag Revolution. At that time 
the northern portion of California was but sparsely settled 
by Americans. There was jealousy by the Mexican Govern- 
ment of their incoming, and the direct threat was made that 
they would be driven from the country. Sutter's Fort was the rallying- 
point of these men, and from thence the members of the Bear Flag party 
proceeded to the then fortified town of Sonoma, captured it and raised 
the flag of the "Republic of California" — the famous Bear flag. That 



crude and improvised banner floated but a short time ; the Stars and 
Stripes took its place and heralded the acquisition of this territory by our 
Government. 

Another incident occurred in January, 1848, that was a marker in 
the history of the civilized world. Sutter had sent James W. Marshall, 
with a party of men, to construct a saw mill at Coloma, in what is now 
the County of El Dorado. It was in the tail race of that saw mill that 
Marshall picked up the golden talisman that was destined to electrify the 
world, and to bring to our shores the picked men of every nation. It 
was the magnet that attracted to California the pioneers who adventured 
by sea and by land in the argonautic days to the land of the golden 
fleece. It was in Sutter's Fort that Marshall brought this precious nug- 
get ; there it was tested and its integrity established. The discovery of 
gold, however, wrought the ruin of the generous old Captain. A new 
population sprang up, and in a few years he was stripped of his great 
landed possessions, his Fort fell into decay, and it was only a few years 
ago when nothing remained except the ruins of the inside building. 
Think, indeed, that for many years that building was used for the raising 
of chickens? But there came a change. The Native Sons of the Golden 
West raised a fund for the restoration of the old Fort, and it is due to 
them that to-day its inclosing walls, as well as the interior, bear the 
semblance of the early days of their history. 

It is not generally known what part that grim old fort played in the 
history of nations. Between the lines there can be seen the hands of 
Russia, France, England, Mexico and the United States. While Sutter 
became a naturalized citizen of Mexico he was a thorough republican 
and ever favored the United States. Had it not been for the establish- 
ment of this fort, there is no question but that the soil of California would 
be now covered by the flag of England, and again, had it not been for the 
output of the gold of California that strengthened our Government dur- 
ing the Civil War in all probability the Confederacy of our States would 
have been shattered. Some years ago, and when the internal building of 
the fort stood solitary on the mound, a sorry reminder of "the days o\ 
old, the days of gold, and the days of forty-nine," General L. H. Foote 
wrote of it this very pretty piece of poetry: 



*^.-- 




Baker & Hamilton 

WHOLESALE DEALERS 
IN UP-TO-DATE 



VEHICLES 



OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 



SEND FOR CATALOG 



Drink Only the Purest 

KY. TAYLOR 
WHISKEY 




FULL QUARTS 



A Perfect Blend Eight Years Old. 

ADAMS-BOOTH CO. 

Distributors, Sacramento, Cal. 

The Johnson Locke Mercantile Co. 

Pacific Coast Agents '.' San Francisco, Cal. 



A CAPDEVILA 



# 



TOR MB 



Is getting to be the popular 
expression : among : cigar 
smokers; it is amazing how 
readily the public distinguishes 
THE REALY GOOD CIGAR 
from the others. There is a 
reason for it. THE CAP- 
DEVILA is a cigar possessing 
the HIGHEST MERITS, 
being made in Tampa by first 
class Cuban workmen and 
from finest grades of Havana 
Tobacco, blended in a 
way to bring out in smoking 
the most Exquisite and Agree- 
able flavor, so extremely 
gratifying to the smoker .... 



HALL, LUHRS & CO. 



SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTORS 



Universal Cement Stone and Machinery Co. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



HOLLOW INTERLOCKING BUILDING BLOCKS 



(BROOKE PATENT) 



The Building Material of tHe Future 




A GROUP OF PATTERNS 



m 


§§ 


m 


i 


HI 


m 



"We also manufacture tKe Universal Interlocking Burial Vaults and MitcKell's Reinforced Cement Posts. The Universal Machines 
are the fastest on the market. State and County rights for sale. "Write for catalogue. J& J& J& ■& j& ■£? .0 J& 



1184=1186 JAMES FLOOD BUILDIING 



SAIN FRAINCISCO, CALIFORNIA 




Ehrman Bros- 
& Company, 

Distributors, 

San Francisco, 



California 



A. SANTAELLA & CO 
Makers 



HEY, GRAUERHOliZ & GOflPAflY 



BE SURE YOU ARE RIGHT THEN GO AHEAD 



< £ < fr < fe , fe , fe , **£ < fe 



224 Front St. 




^^•^•^^•^•^y^T" 



San Francisco 




Chamber of Commerce; Alcalde Parlor, San Francisco, 1. O. O. F. banquet hall; Marshall Parlor, 
San Francisco, 806 K Street; Marysville Parlor and Rainbow Parlor (Wheatland), New Pavilion; 






GYRUS NOBLE WHISKEY 



OLD GOODS 



Now Bottling 



Spring 1895 



Blake, Mofhtt & Towne 



=DEALERS IN= 



PAPER 



Blake, Mofhtt & Towne, Los Angeles. Blake, McFall Co., Portland 
American Paper Co-. Seattle 



55-57-59 and 61 First St. 



San Francisco, Cal. 






OLD CUSTOM HOUSE, MONTEREY, CAL. 



SUTTER'S FORT. 



I stood by the old fort's crumbling wall, 

On the eastern verge of the town ; 
The sun, through clefts in the ruined hall. 

Flecked with its light the rafters brown. 
And sifting with gold the oaken floor, 

Seemed to burnish the place anew ; 
While out and in through the half-closed door, 

Building their nests, the swallows flew. 
Charmed by the magic spell of the place. 

The present vanished, the past returned : 
While rampart and fortress filled, the space, 

And yonder the Indian campfires burned. 
I heard the sentinel's measured tread, 

The challenge prompt the quick reply; 
And there on the tower above my head, 

The Mexican banner flaunts the sky. 

Borne to my ear on the ambient air, 
A^ingled with sounds of childish glee 

I heard again the low hum of care. 
Like the restless moan of the sea. 



Around me were waifs of every clime — 

Blown by the fickle winds of chance ; 
Knight-errants, read)" at any time, 

For any cause, to couch a lance. 
The stanch old Captain, with courtly grace. 

Owner of countless leagues of land, 
Benignly governs the motley race, 

Dispensing favors with open hand. 
On miles of meadow his cattle feed. 

While brown vaqueros. with careless rein. 
Swinging riatas, on restless steed, 

Are dashing madly over the plain. 
Only a moment the vision came. 

Where tower and rampart stood before; 
Where flushed the night with the camp's red flame. 

Dust and ashes, and nothing more. 



Oriental Curhisb 
Batbe 



Positively the best and cleanest baths 
in the dest. Hntiseptically Clean. 
Ocean Salt dater plunge. Barber 
shop open Day and JVigbt. Chiropo- 
dist in attendance. j& j& j& j& 



Room, including Batb, $1.00 

■por Gentlemen only, 



W. J. BLUMBERG & BRO. ( 

PROPRIETORS 

130 Mason St. Phone Main 1558 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 




Sperry Flour Co.'s Mills at 
Stockton, Cal. 



OVR STANDARDS 



Sperrys Best Family. 
Drifted. Snow. 

Golden Gate Extr-a.. 



vS perry Flour Company 



WARREN'S Best of Whiskies 



THE WINEDALE COMPANY 

INCORPORATED 



IOO6-IOO8 Washington St. Telephone Main 99 Oakland, California 




Full Line of Saws, Knives 
And Mill Supplies. 

SIMOND SAW CO. 

31 MAIN ST., SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



L P. DEGEN BELTING CO. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Oak Tanned Leather Belting 

Fulled Rawhide, Belting, Rope 
and Lace Leather 



DEALERS IN 

Rubber and Cotton Belting, Pulleys 
and Mill Supplies 



105=107 Mission Street 
SAIN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



m 




^M^^^Md^^^^d^mS^M^md^m^^m^^mii^^^m 



"Fun for all == =$ll for fun' 



A NATIVE PRODUCT 

Popular as the Native Sons — and in every 
way is worthy of your confidence 

Bohemian Eager 



BUFFALO BREWING COMPANY 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



We keep open house for Carnival week. Come out and 
see us. Take ''P" or 21st street car. 



S^S^^S^^ ; ^^-^M(i^M@^^-^M© : ^»feS®^^i^ 



- 



"BURN ONE" 



?il fnimtm "fc" 

Havana Segars— Unequaled in Quality 



Largest Size 



BOLTZ, CLYMER & COMPANY 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



CALIFORNIA POWDER WORKS 



Wells, Fargo Building : : : : : San Fr 



ancisco 



, Cal. 



Factory Loaders of High Grade Shot Gun 
Ammunition with any of the following smoke- 
less powders "Du PONT," "HAZARD," 
"E. C," "SCHULTZE," and "INFALLIABLE" 



All : Sporting : Goods : Dealers : Carry : Our : Lines 




HEADQUARTERS OF THE FOLLOWING PARLORS. 

Auburn Parlor, Silver Star Parlor (Lincoln), Sierra Parlor (Forest Hill), Mountain Parlor (Dutch 
Flat), Prospect Parlor (Iowa Hill) and Rocklin Parlor, New Pavilion. 



%m4m 



$500.00 : REWARD 



Will be paid to the man 
who can prove that the 



La Natividad Cigar 



Is not the Finest Clear Havana Cigar on the Market 



CARL M. KOENING, REPRESENTATIVE 



THEO. GIER CO. 

Wholesale Wine and Liquor Dealers 

Distributers of the Celebrated Metropole Whiskey, 
Puck Rye, also handlers of Old Straight Bourbon 
Rye Whiskies :::::::::::: 

VINEYARDS AT NAPA, LIVERMORE, 
ST. HELENA 

Main Office, 1 16 Battery St., San Francisca. Branch Office 530 1 2th St. Oakland 





COMBINED HARVESTER AT WORK. 



FARMING 

IN 

SACRAMENTO 

COUNTY 





AFTER THE THRESHING. 




ON THE WAY TO MARKET. 



GRAIN BARGES ON THE SACRAMENTO RIVER. 



THE leading Grocery and Market in Sacramento. Con- 
signments received of Farm Products. The highest 
market prices paid. Get our prices on everything in 
Groceries, etc. Do not fail to inspect this interesting store 
before leaving the city. 



D. DIERSSEN COMPANY 

725-729 J STREET 



Spcrry flour 
Company 



M. Q. SMITH, Manager 

telephone, no 23 main Sacramento, Cal. 



LEON LEWIS, President 



ROBT. O'NEILL. Secretary 



PHONES : 
Sunset, Vale 426 Capital 823 

THE WILSON TEA & COFFEE CO. 

Importers of and Dealers in 

TEAS, COFFEES, SPICES, BAKING 
POWDER AND EXTRACTS 

808 K Street Sacramento, Cal. 



H. L. DEAN 

Cbc Grocer 

What You Buy at 
Dean's is Good 

Corner 20th and J Sts. Sacramento 



AsK for "BEST" Sod 



as 



SACRAMENTO 
CRACKER 
COMPANY 



NOT IN THE TRUST 

If your grocer dosen't Keep them — Ring up 
Sunset, OaK 31 Capital 54- 

4*4* 

lll^-Sl Front Street, Sacramento, Cal 



W. M. ONE1L 



J. E. LYNN 



LYNN & O'NEIL 



(Srorera 



BOTH TELEPHONES 18 



FOURTEENTH and O Sts. SACRAMENTO 



SUNSET, MAIN 561 



CAPITAL 829 



ESTABLISHED 1882 



Perkins $ Co. 

GROCERS 

TEAS, COFFEES, ETC. 



Monthly Price 
List Free 



TWO STORES 

Phone, Main 800, 1028-1030 J Street, 

Perkins, Cal. Sacramento, Cal. 





SETTING OUT THE TREES. 




FRUIT 

CULTURE 

SACRAMENTO 

COUNTY 




IRRIGATING THE TREES. 



H 


__ 








1 

"-'■ 


- Mr%g 




*$.-^*&F Ja 


VJGiia .- ~« ' ; ' 'Seai 


-■' ■ i ■"'■- 






fc* 


« 


■f: ' '-'{HI ' * 


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fa 



PICKING THE FRUIT. 



A THRIFTY YOUNG ORCHARD 



For Up-to-date Furnishings 
Go to 

MgSOWS 
HABERDASHERY 

622 K Street 

Always the newest styles found here first at 
popular prices. 



Also main office 
Of 

Masons Steam Laundry 

Where nothing but first-class work is turned out. 



Cascade Laundry 
Hnd Steam 
Cleaning 
<Horks 



Suits thoroughly renovated 
and pressed $ i .50 



Both phones 1 3 1 



We take orders for all 
kinds of uniforms. :: :: :: 

Sacramento and Sunset 
Parlors, N. S. G. W. tog- 
ged by us. :: :: :: :: 

"Every man in odd" but we can fit him. 
S. W CORNER NINTH AND K 



S1LVIUS & 
SCHOENBACKLER 



BOOK BINDERS 



And Account Book Manufacturers 



^ 



423 J Street 



Sacramento, Cal. 



for fine 
F)ats — 



■* 



Harvey 

Cbc Ratter 



727 K Street 



Suit Cases 
and Valises 



622 J Street, 
Bet. 6th and 7th 



WM. M. PETRIE 



Dealer in 

Men's Clothing and Fine 

Furnishing Goods 



SACRAMENTO 



PHONE. SUNSET RED 582 



SAM STONE 

THE TAILOR 



431 K STREET, SACRAMENTO 




IRRIGATING DITCH— LINED WITH CEMENT. 




THE 

TRIUMPH OF 

IRRIGATION 

IN 

SACRAMENTO 

COUNTY 




IRRIGATING PRUNE ORCHARD-TREES IN BLOOM. 



FLOODING THE ORCHAK D— WATER TENDER AT WORK 




IRRIGATING THE STRAWBERRIES 



'Service First-class* 



Bath tt nauman 



FUNERAL DIRECTORS 



AND EMBALMERS 



Both Phones 218 



1324 J Street 



Sacramento, Cal. 



Both Phones 186 



miller * mcmullcn 



FUNERAL DIRECTORS 



"W 



1021-1023 Ninth Street 



SACRAMENTO, - - - CAL. 



H. E YAHDLEY 
AL. P. BOOTH 



GEO. H. CLARK 

W. A- CBOWELL 



Clark $ Booth Co. 



FUNERAL DIRECTORS 



« 



w 



1017-1019 Fourth Street, 



ei2 -%ilJ- n ^V Ave Sacramento, Cal. 



NOTICE 



Up-to-date florist establishment 
Prices to suit all 
First-class work 

Bouquets from 25c up. Floral designs from 
$1.00 up 

NAVLXT BROS. 

N. S. G.W. Sunset, No. 26 

520 ft Street 

Phones, Sunset Oah 1301. Capital 606 



Phones: Sunset "Vale 151 
Capital 313 



\f \ M. H. EBEL 

f 



THE FLORIST 



Cut Flowers and 
Floral Desig'ns 



631 J Street. 



Sacramento. Cal. 



"HOOT MON" 



THIS IS 



fiugb mcOlilliams 

the Reliable florist 
Proprietor of the €im and 
Suttervillc heights nurseries 

The largest grower of flowers North of San Francisco. 
If you are doubtful as to style of floral arrangement you 
would like to have for a Wedding, Birthday, or something 
for your best girl, or even a funeral, just ring him up, state 
your case and he will do the rest. 

P. O. Box 282 

Telephones, Main 90; Suburban 763 







STATE PRISON AND POWER HOUSE, FOTSOM, SACRAMENTO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. 



CONRADI 
GOLDBERG 




Importers of ^j 

Ceaf tobacco 



The most POPULAR SHELLS 

In the Field On the Marsh 

And at the Traps are 




WHY? Because they are uniform 
and give the BEST RESULTS 




Capital Transfer Van Storage Co. 

CUT PRICES 



% TO Yz SAVED IN EVERYTHING. When you move, 
pack, ship or store furniture, and want perfect service, go to 906 K 
Street. Customers stay with us because of our business methods. 
Competent men and low prices. Agents on all trains. Trunks 25 c. 



CAPITAL TRANSFER VAN STORAGE COMPANY 



906 K STREET 



JOHN F. COOPER, President 




HEADQUARTERS OF THE FOLLOWING PARLORS: 

Genievieve Parlor N. D. G. W., Wagner's Hall (upstairs) ; Yosemite Parlor, N. D. G. W., State Capitla ; Stockton Parlor, Pavilion; Yuba Parlor, 
Pavilion :' Alcatraz Parlor, Pavilion; Bay City Parlor, Pavilion; South San Francisco Parlor, St. George Hotel; La Vesjera Parlor, N D. G.W.,St. George 
Hotel; Gen. Winn Parlor, No. 32, Mary Garrett Steamer; Mt. Diablo Parlor, No. 101, Mary Garrett Steamer; Carquinez Parlor, No. 170, Mary Garrett 
Steamer; Richmond Parlor, No. 217, Mary Garrett Steamer ; Santa Rosa Parlor. No. 28, Pavilion ; Glen Allen Parlor, No. 102, Pavilion ; Soncma Parlor, 
No. Ill, Pavilion; Sebastapo' Parlor, No. 142, Pavilion ; Dolores Parlor, Unity Hall, Foresters Building ; Dolores Parlor, Banquet Hall, Foresters Building. 




WM. H. WARREN 

Jeweler and Optician 



Graduate 
Optician 



ExpCrt ^ 

Repairing 



207 K St. 

Sacramento 




Singer S 



ewing Machines 



LOOK FOR THE BIG RED "S" 

Rented $2.00 Per Month 



82 1 J Street, Bet. Eighth and Ninth 



Sacramento, California 



SACRAMENTO COUNTY 



\ 



Area, 987.66 square miles; nearly as large as Rhode 
Island. 

Population about 50,000. 

Assessed valuation, 1904, $36,184,197. 

Climate equable ; summer nights cool. No sunstroke, 
snow nor blizzard. 

Rail and Transportation facilities, River, Steam and 
Electric. 

Expended on roads, 1904, 584,904. All roads and 
bridges free. 

Average rainfall, 20 inches. 

No recorded failure of crops. 

Contains the noted Flame Tokay Grape District. 

The home of the Bartlett Pear and the French Prune. 

No problem of irrigation ; water readily accessable 
from never failing streams and subterranean supply. 

Soil of unexcelled fertility, on which anything that 
can be grown from Maine to Florida can be successfully 
produced. 

Flourishing orchards and vineyards, with and with- 
out irrigation. 

Contains the second largest vineyard in the world. 

The only district in the State that ships berries in 
full carload lots. 

Has the largest thoroughbred breeding farm in the 
world. 



One of the largest producers of hops of any county 
in the United States. 

Ships to the East and Europe the great bulk of the 
green deciduous fruits of California. 

The home of the Olive and the Fig. 

Fruit and vegetables marketed every month. 
Unexcelled educational facilities. 

Ideal place for diversified farming on small holdings. 

The second county in the State for the production of 
poultry and eggs. 

Sacramento County presents unusual attractions to 
the intelligent, industrious and prudent homeseeker 
who wishes to engage in diversified farming on a small 
holding. Here he will find an equable climate, a fer- 
tile soil, independent irrigation facilities, a ready mar- 
ket, exceptional educational and social advantages, 
commercial and industrial opportunities, combined with 
an opportunity to purchase desirable land at a reason- 
able price. It is the fact that lands adapted for the 
establishment of permanent livelihood under the most 
favoring conditions may be secured on terms both rea- 
sonable and convenient. 

Two Electric Power Lines from American and Yuba 
Rivers afford unlimited energy; the ideal place for manu- 
facturing. 



GOLDEN EAGLE HOTEL 



J. W. WILSON, Proprietor 




STRICTLY 


FIRST 


- CLASS 


COMMERCIAL AND TOURIST HOTEL 


A M E R 1 C 


A N 


PLAN 




Seventh and K Streets, .'. Sacramento, Cal. 



PEERLESS OYSTER GROTTO 

.-. .-. • .-. AND RESTAURANT .-. .-. .-. .-. 



ANDREW MIKULICH 
PROPRIETOR 



FIRST-CLASS IN EVERY RESPECT 
OYSTERS IN EVERY STYLE 



Phones, Sunset Oak 1111. Capital 1001 



1010 Seventh Street, .*. Sacramento, Cal. 



WESTERN HOTEL 



SACRAMENTO, CAL. 



Board and Room $1.25 to $2.00 Per Day 



MEALS 25 CENTS 



Free B jf tJ^ from MORRISON & BURNS, Props 



CAPITAL HOTEL 



THE 



W. O. (JOE) BOWERS, Prop. 

ROOMS $1.00 TO $2.50 PER DAY 
EUROPEAN PLAN 

Cor. Seventh and K Streets, Sacramento, Cal. 



DELMONICO RESTAURANT 



AND OYSTER HOUSE 



PRIVATE LADIES' DINING ROOMS 



712-714 K Street, Sacramento, Cal. 

Opposite Post Office 



HAUB & HAUB, Proprietors 



MAISON FAURE 



L. FAURE, Proprietor 



RESTAURANT DE FRANCE 



MEALS A LA CARTE ATAlLL HOURS 
FAMILY ORDERS, BANQUETS AND WEDDING 
PARTIES A SPECIALTY 



427 K Street, 



Sacramento, Cal. 




SACRAMENTO PARLOR, No. 3 



3y CLARENCE M HUNT, 




Pursuant to a notice published in the Sacramento papers, March 22, 
1878, the Sacramento Branch of the Native Sons of the Golden West, met 
at Knickerbocker Hall, now part of Weinstock & Lubin's store, 
Fourth street, K and L, Matt Coffey, the present Chief of Police 
of this city, acting as Temporary President, and C. E. Parker, now de- 
ceased, as Temporary Secretary. Up to November 12, 1878, the organ- 
ization had not assumed the title of "Parlor," but from then on it has 
been known as Sacramento Parlor, No. 3, N. S. G. W. On this date a 
proposition from California Parlor, No. 1, and Oakland Parlor, No. 2, 
was indorsed, looking to the organization of a Grand Parlor, and H. C. 
Chipman, H. W. Taylor, H. Kohler, W. Nixon and B. O'Neil were elected 
representatives from the Parlor. Sacramento Parlor can, therefore, be 
classed as one of the moving spirits in the organization of the Native 
Sons of the Golden West, and is honored by having the names of two of 
its oldest members — the late H. C. Chipman and Hon. Frank D. Ryan — 
among the list of seven Directors who incorporated the Order June 8, 
1880, and who were later distinguished by becoming Past Grand Presi- 
dents of the Grand Parlor of Native Sons. 

From a mere handful of patriotic Native Sons, Sacramento Parlor has 
grown to be a Parlor of 380 members, and has a treasury of $16,000. It 
has among its members men occupying some of the highest offices in the 
gift of the people ; men of high professional standing ; men at the top- 
most rounds of the various trades and mercantile pursuits ; and has none 
but men of sterling worth and upright character on its roll of member- 
ship. The Parlor has ever responded to the call of charity, and has al- 
ways been to the front in movements looking to the preservation of our 
State's historic landmarks. The idea of restoring Sutter's Fort 
emanated from the meeting-room of Sacramento Parlor, and it and its 
members were large contributors to the fund that made possible the 



purchase of this famous landmark from the heirs of General Sutter, and 
its subsequent presentation to the State of California. 

Sacramento Parlor has among its cherished possession two charters — 
the first granted in 1878 by the mother Parlor, California, No. 1, of San 
Francisco, and the second granted in 1880 by the Grand Parlor of the 
Native Sons of the Golden West. Of the twenty-three original charter 
members of the Parlor but two remain — Matt Coffey of this city and 
Fred Kidder of Sparks, Nevada. 

Following are the Past Presidents of Sacramento Parlor, No. 3, from 
its organization in 1878, up to July 31, 1905 : Benjamin O'Neil, E. B. Car- 
son, H. C. Chipman, H. W. Taylor, F. B. Houston, F. D. Ryan, J. T. Staf- 
ford, E. F. Cohen, H. W. Klays, R. T. Devlin, George H. Clark, Jas. 
Riley, Theo. G. Eilers, J. W. Barrett, E. H. Kraus, J. P. Giamelli, H. 
O. Tubbs, W. A. Gett, C. A. Root, J. M. Henderson, Jr., C. W. Mier, H K. 
Johnson, Jos. B. Leonard, W. Welch, F. M. Bronner, S. T. Smith, H. P. 
Brown, Abe Moose, E. J. Weldon, S. F. Ennis, E. J. Gregory, J. W. 
Haley, A. E. Miller, W. H. Sanders, J. A. Keefe, F. N. Renchler, T. A. 
Cody, J. W. Keating, W. J. Fetherston, C. M. Hunt, J. M. Robbins, R. T. 
Cohn, G. A. Burns, C. D. Crowell, C. G. Battelle, R. G. Potter, W. A. 
White, G. S. Wheeler, F. D. Valentine, F. E. Michel, Jr., and W. J. 
Weisman. 

The present officers of the Parlor are : Junior Past President, W. J. 
Weisman ; President, James S. Hanrahan ; First Vice-President, Samuel 
Pope, Jr. ; Second Vice-President, E. M. Lynch ; Third Vice-President, 
A. J. Delano; Recording Secretary, Clarence M. Hunt; Financial Secre- 
tary, Abe Moose ; Treasurer, S. I. Hopkins ; Trustees — C. A. Root, Dr. A. 
H. Hawley, T. W. McAuliffe ; Marshal, J. F. Didion ; Inside Sentinel, 
E. W. Messner ; Outside Sentinel, C. F. Dosch ; Surgeons, Drs. A. M. 
Henderson, W. J. Hanna, F. Krull, E. M. Wilder. 




When Yov Get 

a cool, refreshing drink you 
don't always stop to think of its 
wholesomeness — that's proper- 
ly attended to in 

Rainier Beer 



Whether you want wholesome- 
/ ness or good flavor, you get 
more in this drink than in any 
other, no exceptions 

TICOULET & BESHORMAN 

Sunset Vale 781 Capital 709 

1420 J Street Sacramento, Cal. 



Every Native Californian and almost 
every American knows Waterman's 
Ideal is the standard fountain pen of 
the world. Agents everywhere. :: 



§&5 



Waterman's (Ideal) Fountain "Pen 






<%$!> 



"Glenmorangie" Scotch 
"Betmont" Bourbon 
"fiuckleberry" 6iti 
"Nutwood" Rye 



established 

i860 



Cbese famous goods 
Imported solely 
By 



JAMES GIBB 

Importer and Dealer in tbe best 
brands of Foreign and Domestic 
Wmes and Liquors j& j& 



609 to 617 MERCHANT ST. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 



And it's the health idea — the true grocery 
spirit that permeates our system. We're 
cMaster Grocers for your sake. We don't simply 
sell goods for profit. 

Food for brain, food for brawn, food that 
is strengthening, that gives energy and courage. 

Goldberg, Bowen & Go. 

"Master Grocers" 



OUR STORES : 
432 Pine Street, . 
232 Sutter Street, 
2329 California Street, 
1401 Haight Street, 
Oakland : 13th and Clay Streets, 



TELEPHONE : 
Private Exchange One 
Private Exchange 100 
West 101 
Park 456 
Main One 




PAVILION OF THE STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY, SACRAMENTO 



EAGLESON&CO. 

Manufacturers and Importers 

mint's jFunriahittg 
(Siio&b attfi S>l)trtB 

717 K Street, Sacramento 

NEXT TO POSTOFFICE 



OUR OTHER STORES: 



748-750 Market St.. San Francisco 
1058 Market St., San Francisco 



242 Montgomery St., San Francssco 
I 12 South Spring St., Los Angeles 



Sole Agent for DUNLAP HATS 

Are You Buying 
Your Hats From 

STICH 

THE HATTER? 



»»TTT1 






If not— Why not? ] 

815 K STREET, (Clunie Block)] 



for Reliable JMen's furnishing 6ood8, 
HATS call at 




ytfnvT ERS & furnishe rs^, 

MAX SIMON, Proprietor 



LEIPSIC 

702 K St. Bet. "7th and 8th Sts. 



Agents for 

ORTHOPEDIC $3.50 SHOES For 

Men and Women 
FOOTFORM $2.50 SHOES For Men 
RADCLIFF $2.50 SHOE For Women 

Kverything In footwear for the children and 
babies at lowest prices. 

LEIPSIC'S 

Trading Stamps 702 K Street 



Spectacles and Eyeglasses 

MADE TO ORDER OR REPAIRED 



S. STURMER 




EYES EXAMINED 



Oculists 

Prescriptions 

Filled 




3fine BJatrh anil ilrinrlni 
BppaUing a g'nrrtaltji. 

3rutrlrtj fHafir fat (0ri>rr. 



903 K STREET 

SACRAMENTO 



502 11 STREET, SACRAMENTO 



EMIL STEINMAN 

SELLS 

Sttuiumita, HIatrljFa aitfc Jwuelru, 

At prices a little lower than elsewhere. 



E. W. BOOK 






CASH OR INSTALLMENTS 

QUALITY GUARANTEED 



(Efltttrartflr 
anil Hutlow 






3r? Qfaropamj 



Phone 657-4 Bells 



BOTH PHONES 94 



1 have been established in Sacramento since 1873. Remember the 
place, 1012 FOURTH STREET, between J and K 



2911 H STREET 



SACRAMENTO 



SIXTH AND F STS. 



SACRAMENTO 




GOLD DREDGING. FOLSOM, SACRAMENTO COUNTY 




MINERAL 

WEALTH 

OF 

CALIFORNIA 




KERN RIVER OIL FIELDS 




OIL WELLS WITHIN CORPORATE LIMITS OF LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



OIL WELLS IN THE OCEAN SUMMERLAND, SANTA BARBARA COUNTY 



J. II. DONNELLY 



FRANK. F.. -WRIGHT 



Wilson's Stables 



WRIGHT & DONNELLY 
PROPRIETORS 



Rubber-Tire Livery of all Descriptions 

Rubber-Tire Hacks Furnished Day and Night By 
Telephoning lo ihe Stable Both Phones 17 

3 1 6-3 I 8 K Street, : Sacramento, Cal. 



Leave Orders at Golden Eagle Hotel, Seventh and K. 
Both Phones No. 9 



Central :: Stables 



J. L. RICHARDS 



PROPRIETOR 



Livery and Boarding Stables 

Up-to-Date Turnouts : : : 
Boarding Horses a Specialty 

1019-1021 J Street, : Sacramento, Cal. 

Capital Phone 843. Sunset Phone Oak 651 



FASHION STABLES 

510-12-14 K ST., SACRAMENTO, CAL. 




Livery, Boarding and Feed Stable 

HACKS, COUPES AND STYLISH TURNOUTS 

CHAS. W. PAINE 

Telephones: Sunset, South No. 581; Capital, No. 181 



J. A. LAFFERTY 



F. A. LAFFERTY 



LAFFERTY'S 

Ctoery ana Boarding Stable 

1015=1017 K Street 



Hacks Furnished at all Hours. Excursions and Picnic Parties a Spe- 
cialty. Horses and Carriages to Let 
at Reasonable Terms 



Capital Telephone, 238 
Sunset, Vale 1051 



Sacramento, Cal 



WHEN we opened our office last March 
we promised to safeguard and protect 
the best interest of our clients, and would aim to 
gain their confidence by straightforward dealing 
and the establishing of a progressive business 
policy. How well we have carried out our 
promises is shown by the large number of satis- 
fied clients whose business we are now giving 
prompt and reliable attention. 

We want you as one of our clients; the same 
promises hold good to you. Will you be one ? 

401 j Robert $0H m •' 

Real Estate and Insurance Brokers 



THE 



Capital Carriage Company 




STANDS 



Capital Hotel. Hanlon's. Welcome Saloon 



Phones, Sunset, Oak 226 
Capital 948 



SACRAMENTO, CAL 







F. J. Johns L. H. Hinsdale Frank D. Ryan A. Moose W. J. Weisman Geo. C. Sherman H. E. Yardley Edw. Cox, Jr. 

L. B. Wilson C. E. Mahoney R. G. Potter Ed. H. Kraus John T. Skelton W. A. White T. R. Jones F. H. Conn 

H. B. Bradford Frank Michel 

A. C. Kaufman Chas. Crowell A. S. Cohn Alberl Elkus C. M. Hunt G. A. Burns Fred. Boilano 



Cbc Hlpba 



FINE CANDIES 
And ICE CREAM 



>c* »e* >? telephone: Sunset, Talc 8571 ^ ^ ^ 



926 K Street 



Sacramento, Cat 



Your Furniture Dollars 
Will Do Double Duty 
At the CAPITAL 



$1.00 WEEKLY ON $65.00 WORTH 
$6.00 MONTHLY ON $100.00 WORTH 
$50.00 MONTHLY ON $1000.00 WORTH 

You can buy of us and buy right 
no other house can undersell us. 



CAPITAL FURNITURE MFG. CO. 

616 J STREET, SACRAMENTO, CAL. 




THE ONLY 

ODORLESS 

DRESS 

SHIELD 

MADE 



For Sale At All First= 
Class Dry Goods Stores 



Cbc BonBonnim 

SWEETS AND ICES 



420 K Street 




Che .Heme family 
theatre 



SUNSET, MAIN 433 CAPITAL PHONE 701 

RESIDENCE, SUNSET BLACK 121 






Mclaughlin draying co. 



Sacramento 



THE CREAMERIE 



C. F. SCHWILK, Manager 



SPECIALTIES : 
Cream, Ice Cream, Milk, Buttermilk, Unsalted Butter 



C. W. GODARD, 

PROPRIETOR AND MANAGER 



tfr 



THE LARGEST AND MOST 
POPULAR FAMILY RESORT 
IN THE CITY. :; :: :: 






109 K STREET 



SACRAMENTO 



THE HALIFAX BROS. CO. 

Have their extracts in every 
first=class store in Northern 
California. 



both phones 72 q J STREET, SACRAMENTO 



1115 Seventh Street 



Sacramento, Cal. 



Manufacturers and Bottlers, Sacramento, Cal. 




GEORGE C. PARDEE, GOVERNOR 



ALDEN ANDERSON, LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR 




BRIGHTON MILLING CO. 

DEALERS IN 

Grain and Flour. Meals and Mill 
Feed. Manufacturers of the cele= 
prated BRIGHTON FLOUR, full 
roller process, swing sifter system. 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



I MIL SCHMID, 
President 



H. E. KLEINSORGE, 
Sec'y and Treas. 



WALTER C. PARKER, 
Vice-Pres. 



PHONES : 
Sunset, Black 401 Capital 389 



Schmid & Parker Packing Co. ,Inc. 

Dealers in Fresh, Salted and Smoked 
Meats and all Kinds of Sausages. Our 
pure kettle rendered Lard, Sugar Cured 
Ham Bacon and Sausage are unsurpassed 



1400 J STREET 



SACRAMENTO, CAL. 



W. A. JEFFERSON 




M AfSJUF^AOTUREF? 

C. F.CURRY 

CIGARS 

CAPITAL PHONE 5 1 ~t 



1008 9th ST., SACRAMENTO, OAL. 



E T V^ E E N d AND K 



R E E T S 



StiKT 




OPEN 

SUNDAYS 

FROM 

9 A. M 

TO 

4 P. M. 



FOTOGRAFER 



SACRAMENTO 

SAN FRANCISCO 

STOCKTON 



freeman 
fiotel « « 



Most Popular Summer, and Winter Resort in 
the Foothills. Electric Bells, Elecrtic Lights. 
Porcelain Bath Tubs. Sample Rooms up and 
down town. Headquarters for Mining Men, 
Commercial Travelers, Tourists. Free Bus 
up and down town. J& J& J& & 

FREEMAN & WALSH. 

Proprietors 



OPPOSITE RAILROAD DEPOT 

EAST AUBURN, SE^gff!!* 



Sunset, Vale 231 
Capital 918 



WHITE HELP OM.Y 



TREMONT HOTEL 



THOS. O'CONNOR, Proprietor 



Bo ard and Lodging $5 and $7 Per Week 

Fine Wines and Liquors >P The Celebrated I. W. Harper 
Whiskey and Shaw's Pure Malt >? High Grade Cigars 



112-114 J STREET 



Sacramento, Cal. 



si nsi r. \,i<- is«i 



OPEN DAY AND NIGHT 



PALACE RESTAURANT 



SCHAl) BROS., PROPS. 



OYSTERS IN ANY STYLE 




•424 K. STREET. Bet. 4th and 5th SACRAMENTO, CAL. 



CAPITAL PHONE 836 



SUNSET, OAK 1651 



flarifir (&WW 
lakm} 

RICE BROTHERS 
1014 Ninth Street Sacramento, Cal 



for a nice Steak or a 
6ood cup of Coffee 
6o to the 

EAGLE 

COFFEE 

PARLOR 



403 K Street 



Oak 8372 



If you want a nice cold 
Lunch or salad of any 
Description go to 

LAI'S 
DELICATESSEN 

1021 •fourth Street 



Vale 8462 



H. LAU, Proprietor 



One Block from 
Capitol 



TAMALES 
SPANISH BEANS 
ENCHALADAS 
ETC. 



THE CAPITOLA CAFE 

900 L STREET 
SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



Refreshments served day and night. The only first-class tamale 
parlor in the city. 



Phone Oak 8601 



Capital 413 Two Bells 



A. ROBINSON 

THE DELICACY MAN AND CATERER 



Maker of High Grade Delicacies, Spanish 
Sauce and Beans. Dealer in imported and 
domestic goods wholesale and retail. :: :: 






STORE, 1012 NINTH ST 



SACRAMENTO 



Sledding Cakes a 
Specialty 



Che Best and Largest 
Loaves of Bread 



6ropp's Vienna Bakery 
and Restaurant 



Capital phone 567 



915 K Street 



Cahes and pastry of 6very Des- 
cription HI ways on f>and 



Sacramento, Cal. 



excellent Meals at all fxsurs at 
Moderate prices 



R. GILBERT TONGE CO. 

Jiainters m\b S^rnratora 

FRESCOING, PAINTING AND PAPERHANG1NG 
DESIGNS. SIGNS, PICTORIAL PAINTING, ETC. 
ESTIMATES AND DESIGNS FURNISHED * V» 

OUTSIDE WORK OUR SPECIALTY 

PHONE : Capital 590 

1019 Tenth Street Sacramento, Cal. 



Only White Help Employed 



Up-to-Date Meals, 25c 



r. 






[ FISH THAT'S FISH ] 

CVERYTHING in fresh and salt water 
*— ' fish in perfect freshness as well as all 
shelled varieties in season. 

Courteous Treatment — Prompt Deliveries. 

\ AMERICAN FISH COMPANY \ 

I 714 J STREET j 



THE 

N0NPAR1EL RESTAURANT 

AND LUNCH COUNTER 

E. R. BENTON, PROPRIETOR 

812 K STREET CAPITAL PHONE 979 



Open All Night 



Oysters Any Style 



Following are the members of Sacramento Parlor, No. 3 : 
J. E. Anderson, George Beard, C. J. Bagnall, A. E. Bocklich, F. E. 
Briggs, W. H. Basler, F. Beal, F. Baumgartel, E. Bolze, J. H. Batcher, 
W. F. Bellmer, T. Brogan, J. J. Buchanan, J. C. Boyd, J. W. Butler, J. J. 
Bauer, C. G. Battelle, J. J. Byrne, G. C. Baumgartel, D. Barnes, G. A. 
Burns. J. G. Black, V. J. Bartels, H. T. Burns, Wm. Bartels, E. A. Bush, 
J. M. Cronan, O. H. Clark, A. W. Clifton, H. E. Castle, R. M. Colclough, 
E Cohn, R. T. Cohn, W. A. Cooke, A. F. Callahan, W. Carragher, W. C. 
Crofton, Ira Conran, R. Clark, W. H. Collins, C. D. Crowell, T. A. Cody, 
M. Coffey, H. J. Carragher, George H. Clark, W. G. Clark, John Cadogan. 
C. H. Clark, G. H. Curtiss, D. K. Colclough, A. J. Dahlin, Rudolph Doer- 
mer, F. Dreyer, C. F. Dosch, W. Dosch, D. J. Desmond, J. B. Doty, F. S. 
Davis, J. V. Ducoing, R. T. Devlin, Jas. Doran, J. W. Daroux, Geo. 
Dosch, F. A. Daroux, J. P. Dunning, J. M. Dunnigan, A. J. Delano, F. 
Didion, G. M. Didion, F. B. Ewing, M. H. Ebel, E. S. Elkus, C. M. En- 
wright, H. E. Ewing, S. F. Ennis, W. J. Elder, L. T. Freitas, E. F. 
Frazer, T. Fox, W. A. Fowler, Wm. Fouse, H. Fisher, Dr. A. P. Finan, 

A. Ross, Jr., R. D. Finnie, J. Falkenstein, P. H. Fletcher, W. Floberg, 
H. A. Franson, F. E. Fetherson, W. J. Fetherston, D. E. Fourness, J. 
Feeney, Chas. Fahlo, Wm. Gregory, F. Gabrielli, A. Gonzales, F. T. 
Grossi, G. F. Gray, J. T. Gormley, D. Gillis, F. W. Groth, G. H. Gray, A. 
E. Grigsby, W. A. Gett, G. Gifford, J. Giameli, F. P. Gehring, J. E. Gor- 
man, G. C. Gupton, J. N. Hyde, J. L. Hymes, A. C. Huelsman. L. J. 
Hinsdale, W. J. Hewes, A. G. Hooper, Harold Holten, W. A. Hicks, W. 
H. Hopkins, R. H. Hawley, A. Heinrich, H. Heilbron, F. P. Humrich, 

B. F. Howard. J. M. Henderson, Wm. Henderson. S. G. Hendricks, G. E. 
Hook, J. W. Haley, Dr. W. J. Hanna, S. I. Hopkins, G. L. Herndon, Dr. 
A. M. Henderson, H. Hunger, C. M. Hunt, B. M. Hodson, E. H. Harvev, 
Dr. A. H. HaAvley, C. F. Hartmeyer. N. B. Holmes, F. J. Dickey. J. Han- 
rahan, John C. Ing, J. W. Judd, E. A. Johnson, J. E. Staiger, J. J. 
Johnson, J. B. Jensen, T. P. Juckes, H. K. Johnson, M. Judge, T. R. 
Jones, R. C. Juckes, H. G. Krebs. F. Kidder. "F. Kuechler, C. E. Klein- 
sorge, F. Krebs, W. Kunz, C. H. Keil, T. E. Kennedy, A. Klein- 
sorge, J. W. Keating, William Kennedy, J. A. Keefe, J. P. Kelly, R. E. 
Kent, E. H. Kraus, G. J. Kromer, L. B. Kiernan, F. Kummerfeldt, C. M. 
Koening, R. O. Kimbrough, H. A. Kidder, M. M. Kennedv, Dr. F. Krull 
E. R. Lee, H. J. Lugg, T. H. Longton, F. Lyman, T. D. Littlefield. G F. 
Leitch, W. A. Latta, E. M. Lynch, W. M. Lamphrey, J. C Lom- 



bardi, G H. P. Lichthardt, James Lannagan, L. T. Lefebore, W. M. 
Lamphrey, C. W. Lamphrey, F. A. McLean, J. R. Morrill, A. 
J. Michel, James Mathena, I. Morris, G. W. Morrill, G. Millman, J. H. 
Monson, M. Mullaney, M. Menke, C. W. Mier, George Mails, O. H. 
Miller, E. W. Messner, W. J. Mier, A. E. Miller, George Menke, H. Meir, 
F. Mead, H. E. McKee, T. W. McAuliffe, Abe Moose, G. H. Miller, 
Dr. C. L. Megowan, W. H. McMorrv, L. E. McCoy, W. J. McLaughlin, 
M. Maltby, F. Michel, G. T. Neece, E. Nielsen, C. G. W. Noack, I. D. 
Nathan, C. Neubourg, T. B. Norton, F. Neumann, A. J. Newman, M. S. 
Nathan, W. F. Nagele, L. R. Nichols, H. Nicolaus, W. E. Newbert, 

F. M. Newbert, I. C. Nathan, J. T. O'Connor, E. A. O'Neil, E. H. Nelson, 
T. T. O'Toole, F. O'Brien, H. A. O'Connor, T. F. O'Connell, F. J. O'Brien, 
H. F. Price, S. Pope, J. N. Pittman, W. H. Pugh, A. J. Plunkett, T. J. 
Pennish, W. L. Pritchard, C. H. Putnam, R. Pollock, A. I. Perrin, C. N. 
Post, C. Paine, J. T. Plunkett, R. G. Potter, F. J. Pierce, W. F. Quintaro, 

G. A. Ray, B. D. Richart, F. D. Ryan Jr., A. J. Rice, C. J. Rollins, J. 
Riley, W. M. Rose, B. U. Rusell, F. D Ryan, F Rohrer, C. A. Root, H. P. 
Ryan, L. Reeber, J. F. Ryan, A. Robinson, F. J. Ruhstaller, F. A. Reich- 
ert, F. Roth, P. F. Ruman, J. M. Rippon, J. M. Robbins, C. H. Rippon, 
Percy Reese, F. N. Renschler, T. Rust, W. E. Rippon, G. J. Rippon. J. L. 
Richards, L. W. Renschler, R. K. Schardin, V. P. Sermonet, F. E. 
Schmidt, F. H. Schardin. P. N. Schmitt, E. G. Sullivan, J. Steinmiller, 
George Sellinger, Wm. Shields, L. Schindler, T. Studarus, C. Schreiner, 
R. P. Shorrock, H. W. Schacht, J. T. Stafford, F. J. Sermonet, W. H. 
Sanders, G. J. Scully, W. Schmidt, A. J. Starling, C. Schoenbachler G. F. 
Shepherd, W. J. Sheehan, E. J. Schwartz, L. E. Schwartz. W. W. Scol- 
lay, J. C. Scroggs, E. D. Sheehan, J. W. Shinkle, G. M. Staiger, R. E. 
Shields, D. C. Sweeney, E. Schilling, George Schaefer, B. F. Shinkle. E. 
F. Scully, Charles Scullv, W. H. Sexton, R. C. Staiger, J. H. Schacht 
E. H. Smith, H. E. Sleeper, Dr. E. C. Turner, H. O. Tubbs. W. H. Toll. 
C. O. Tanquarv, H. Thiele, W. D. Toomey, J. C. Toomey, H. Uhl, W. H. 
Uhl W. Van Guilder, J. J. Vogeli, Geo. Vice, F. D. Valentine, Earl Wil- 
liams, Dr. E. M. Wilder.", W. C. Wilcock, L. C. Wright, E. Wahl, F. A. 
Whisler, C. Woodburn, W. Welch, Dr. R. L. Wait, Dr. E. J. Weldon, F. 
Welch, B. B. Welch, F. Wakefield. A. M. Wolf. J. F. Woods, G. T. White, 
W T . N. Woods, A. Wilson, W. H. Williamson, F. W. Whitmore, Max 
Weiss. E. A. Wilmunder, W. A. White, H. G. Waterman, W. J. Weis- 
man, F. W. Weidemann, L. T. Weil, G. S. Wheeler, W. Winn, G. W. 
Young, G. A. Yuhre, F. Yager, L. Zoller, F. Ziegler. 




Keep in Good Humor 
With Yourself 



It's Easy — 
Smoke 



El Belmont 

Clear Havana 
Cigars 



"The NEW kind." 



















PROGRAM MK 





















LABOR DAY, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 4th, 1905 



Joint committee from the Councils of Federated Trades and Building 
Trades: George Duffy, President ; M. F. Connors, Treasurer; J. S. Blair, 
Secretary; L. A. Dudgeon, D. D. Sullivan, J. J. Bailey, P. T. Johnston, 
M. T. Hudson, E. G. Johnson, W. F. Hite, J. Paladini, W. Myers, A. S. 
Hildebrandt, C. S. Tryon, A. H. Millon, J. W. Hanford, E. Tracy, H. G. 
Frey, J. Frances, A. Fogalsang. 

Program for Labor Day will include dancing at the Pavilion in the 
afternoon and evening, general assembling of all the unions on the even- 
ing of Labor Day, and each evening of the Fair several different unions 
will combine and assemble in the Pavilion as a special feature. 

Saturday, the 2nd, will be — Painters, Laundry Workers, Icemen, 
Laundry Wagon Drivers, Electrical Workers, Blacksmiths, Bakers, 
Bakers' Helpers, Flour and Feed Mill Employes, Plasterers. 

Monday — All the Unions. 



Tuesday — Carpenters, Musicians, Plumbers, Barbers, Bakery Wagon 
Drivers, Bookbinders, Broommakers, Cooks' Alliance, Lathers, Pressmen. 

Wednesday — Millmen, Cement Workers, Brewery Workmen, Brewery 
Team Drivers, Bottlers, Engineers, Firemen, Journeymen Horseshoers, 
Material Team Drivers. 

Thursday — Bricklayers, Hodcarriers, Cigarmakers, Boilermakers, 
U. B. R. E., Leather Workers, Lumber Handlers, Retail Clerks, Stage 
Hands. 

Friday — Brick, Tile and Terra Cotta Workers of Lincoln, Granite 
Cutters of Rocklin, Sheet Metal Workers, Electrical Workers, Printers, 
Iron Molders, Laborers' Protective Association. 

Saturday — Tailors, Street Railway Employes, Truckmen, Waiters and 
Waitresses, Bootblacks and Stablemen. 

Floats in Electrical Parade in evening of the 9th. 






3 $3jt.v frK ^v.v frk £xJu^ £xuf^ £?Wn f" 



George A. Moore 
PRESIDENT 



LIKE THE NATIVE SONS 



Samuel M. Marks 
SECRETARY 



THE 



PACIFIC MUTUAL 

Life Insu r ance Company 



Is a California Institution, Organized in Sacramento 38 years ago. $16,000,000 
paid policy holders. $8,000,000 Assets. The Pacific Mutual offers superior Life En- 
dowment, Accident, Health Policies. Best legal organization of any American Company 



THOS. FOX 
MANAGER 
SACRAMENTO 



HOME OFFICE PACIFIC MUTUAL BUILDING 



SAN 



FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



KILGARIFF and 
BEAVER 

Gen. Agts. Life Depl 




C. F. Curry, Secretary of State 



Truman Reeves, Treasurer 



E. P. Colgan, Controller 



:GET A: 



"GATO 



** 









MY PERFERIDA 

HAVANA CIGAR 
For Sale Everywhere 



S. BACHMAN & CO. 

COAST AGENTS 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



P. J. WENIGER 
= fr CO. ^= 



IMPORTERS 



w 



COMMODORE RYE AND BOURBON 

"Roderick Dhu" Scotch 
Hannis Whiskey 
"Brown Corbett & Co." Irish 
Pinet, Caslillon & Co. 
Sazarac Cocktails 
A. Lalande & Co. 
Schulz & Wagner 
Galbrailh, Grant & Co., Gins 
P. Bardiner, Cordials 

WHITE ROCK LITHIA 






PHONE BUSH 20 



1 1 -1 03 Powell St., - San Francisco 



w w w w 
w w w # 
# w w # 



SUNSET PARLOR, No. 26 



By B\ J. JOHNS 



w w w w W Wl 
w f # w f wl 
# w w w w w\ 



Sunset Parlor, No. 26, Native Sons of the Golden West, shares with 
her sister Parlor, Sacramento, No. 3, location within the Capital City of 
the State of California. 

By those who were here at that time, the 26th day of January, 1884, 
is remembered as one of those typical California winter days, when the 
clouds supply a very copious fall of rain throughout the larger part of 
the day, but, with the approach of evening, the sun bursts through the 
wintry pall as he sinks into the west, flooding all the land with the gold 
and crimson beauty of a gorgeous sunset. 

It was on this day that thirty-one young men of Sacramento agreed to 
meet and organize a subordinate Parlor of the order of Native Sons of 
the Golden West. They felt that propitious omens were given to the 
undertaking in that the number of signers of the charter roll was thirty- 
one ; California being the thirty-first State admited into the Union. The 
fact that the new Parlor was the twenty-sixth of the order naturally drew 
their attention to the coincidence that it was conceived upon the twenty- 
sixth day of the month and of the year, and the memory of the grand 
sunset which had brought to a close that memorable day was the in- 
spiration for the suggestion of Miss Jennie Lindley, who became Mrs. L. 
J. Witherbee, that the name "Sunset" be given to the new Parlor. The 
interest of the young ladies, the friends and sisters of the charter mem- 
bers of the Parlor, equalled that of the young men, and to them was 
given the privilege of naming the Parlor. The suggestion of Miss Lind- 
ley was adopted and the name "Sunset," inspired by the beautiful de- 
parture of day, upon the approach of that eventful evening, when the sun 
of the heavens had rolled away the draperies of the storm in time to evi- 
dence, by one brief smile, his approval of the step about to be taken by 
those young men who added the name of "Sunset" to the list of Parlors 
of our Order. 

The first meeting was held in Grangers' Hall, Tenth and K streets, 
and the Parlor was formally instituted by the Grand Officers of the 
order, Grand Vice-President Hembach presiding. The initiatory ritual 
was exemplified by the officers of Sacramento Parlor, No. 3, after which 
Brother Robert T. Devlin, of Sacramento Parlor, and then District 
Deputy Grand President, installed the following as the first officers of 
Sunset Parlor : Past President, C. E. Burnham ; President, C. R. Par- 
sons ; First Vice-President, Frank T. Johnson; Second Vice-President 
A. J. Johnston ; Third Vice-President, Wm. Ingram, Tr. ; Recording Sec- 
retary, H. I. Seymour; Financial Secretary, Frank Hickman; Treasurer 



Douglas Lindley ; Marshal, Crawford Cox ; Inside Sentinel, Lee Brown ; 
Outside Sentinel, A. J. Muir ; Trustees, W. A. Stephenson, W. W. Mar- 
vin, J. E. Larue. 

If space permited it would be a pleasure to detail the history of many 
events in which Sunset Parlor has participated. It would be possible 
to write a story, using material drawn from the Parlor archives, that 
would stir the hearts of all who read it, and which would illustrate, by 
relating of examples set by brothers who have passed beyond the touch 
of our hands, the principles for which our order stands, and the cher- 
ished ideas which we would have promulgated by our members. 

One of the most important events in the early history of the Parlor, 
and one for which the fondest memories are held, occurred on the 5th day 
of September, 1884, just prior to the first Admission Day Celebration in 
this city. 

The occasion was the presentation of a banner to Sunset Parlor by the 
sisters and lady friends of its members. For months previous the ladies 
had worked hard in raising the necessary funds, not a small task when 
it was considered that two hundred and fifty dollars was the amount 
collected. By agreement among the donors this sum was obtained only 
by subscription from the lady friends of the members. Miss Zoe John- 
son, a sister of Frank T. Johnson, who was then President of the Par- 
lor, was the moving spirit in the undertaking and she was ably assisted 
by the Misses Jennie Lindley, Jennie McFarland, Lillie Wilcox, Addie 
Johnson, another sister of the Parlor's President, Lottie Wilsey, Mamie 
Denson and many others. The presentation was made in Pioneer Hall 
and in behalf of the Parlor's generous friends. Miss Lillie Wilcox, in pre- 
senting the banner said, in part : "In behalf of the ladies of Sacramento, 
who, like yourself, are interested in the welfare of this, our glorious 
State, I present to you a slight token of their appreciation of your noble 
endeavor to bind together in closer bonds of union the native born sons 
of the soil. The aims and aspirations of your organization we know to 
be for the elevation of our young men to a higher standard of that which 
is good and true ; and we, the native daughters, would aid and encourage 
you to still more earnest endeavors. Let this standard ever be to you a 
reminder of our good wishes and of our high and lofty hopes. * * * 
Accept this standard, and with it know that you receive our hopes, our 
wishes and our love." 

President Frank T. Johnson, in behalf of the Parlor, accepted the ban- 
ner in the following words ; "We accept the trust you have confided to 



MURCELL & SMITH 



BUILDERS 



ADDRESS, P. O. BOX 40, SACRAMENTO, CAL. 



CONSTRUCTS BUILDINGS IN ALL PARTS OF CALIFORNIA 



our keeping. Pure and undefiled it conies from your hands, resplendent 
in its beauty, every fold reflecting the purity and goodness of its donors. 
* * * As President of Sunset Parlor permit me to express the grati- 
fication of all its members at the compliment which has been paid us 
to-night. The same chivalry, the same tender regard which made 
"Sweethearts and Wives" the invariable toast about the camp-fires of 
49, animates the sons of those Pioneers to-day. On behalf of this Par- 
lor, ladies, I therefore thank you once more for this beautiful offering." 

The spirit of the ladies of twenty-one years ago has been transmitted 
to the Native Daughters of to-day and the many favors and kind acts 
which are bestowed by them upon the Native Sons can never be fully 
repaid. 

Sunset Parlor is the proud possessor of two of the most beautiful flags 
to be found within the confines of the Golden State; a Bear flag and the 
flag of our country, the Stars and Stripes, presented to us by Califia Par- 
lor, No. 22, Native Daughters of the Golden West. 

Not the least of the treasures of Sunset Parlor is a group picture of the 
Sacramento Society of Pioneers, the gift of Mr. O. W. Erlewine, City 
Superintendent of Schools of this city. 



Sunset Parlor has even been proud of the personnel of her membership. 
Her members have been honored by being elected to high offices in the 
Grand Parlor, and they have filled responsible positions in various walks 
of life, both public and private, and feel that the Parlor has been one of 
their first stepping stones to greater and better things. 

The first celebration of Admission Day in this city, and the first one in 
which Sunset Parlor participated, was on September 9th, 1884, and Sun- 
set Parlor on that occasion was singularly honored by having one of 
her members, Brother J. E. Larue, chosen by the Grand Parlor, which 
met that year at Marysville, to act as Grand Marshal. John T. Skelton. 
Jr., was elected Grand Marshal by the last Grand Parlor which met this 
year at Monterey. He is a Past President of Sunset Parlor, so once more 
the great parade of the Native Sons will be led through the streets of 
Sacramento by a member of Sunset Parlor. 

Hanging upon our Parlor walls is a tablet upon which are engraved the 
names of our departed brothers. They are as follows: F. H. Moore. M. 
L. Hammer, L. A. Young, C. E. Burnham, P. P., W. C. Reith, G. W. Lar- 



kin, W. H. Went worth, G. 
G B. Lovdal, P. P. 



A. Archibald, R. W. Sullivan, L. G. Nixon, 







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REPRESENTED BY 



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HICKMAN-COLEMAN CO., 412 J STREET, SACRAMENTO 




District Court of Appeal, for the Third Appe.iate District, California, Denized Apri, ,5, 1905. Its Sessions are he,d at the City „, Sacramento 

I. A. j. Buckl. 2. N. P. Chip™,,, P,„idi„ g Juafce 3. C. E. Mi.ughlm 4. H. W. Wood., Cfc* 



Phone Oak 7727 



Capital Phone 241 2B 



Alden W. Campbell 



ARCHITECT 




OFFICE, CASEY BUILDING 
528', J STREET, SACRAMENTO, CAL. 



Koebel Box Factory 

CIGAR BOXES, LABELS 
RIBBONS, AND ALL 
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SUPPLIES 






Factory 723 Bryant Street 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 




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FINE TAILORING Cor. Sixth and J 



A. P. SCHELD & CO. 

NON-RECTIFIERS 
Importers and Wholesale Dealers 




FINE WINES, WHISKIES and BRANDIES 

REPRESENTING :::::: 

J. M. Atherton & Co. Distillery New Haven, Ky. 
Old Lewis Hunter Distillery, Lair, Ky, 
Gundlach-Bundschu Wine Co., San Francisco, Cal. 
CORONA PORTS AND SHERRIES 

OFFICE AND CELLARS 
2803-2807 M Street, : : : : Sacramento, Cal. 



JOHN D. SCHROEDER FERRIS HARTMAN 

PHONE SOUTH 1061 



THE . 



Ferns Hartman Cafe 



" CHRISTY, PULL *EM DOWN " 




BOWLING ALLEYS AND CAFE 
1 05 Mason Street, San Francisco, Cal. 







Victor H. Woods, Surveyor General 



W. W. Shannon, Supl. Slate Printing 



Thos. J. Kirk, Supt. Public Instruction 




AGRICULTURAL PAVILION PROGRAMME 

CAPITOL PARK ::::::::::: ADMISSION FREE 


«# 



GRAND AGRICULTURAL DISPLAY :: BIG POULTRY SHOW :: GRAND ELECTRIC DISPLAY :; DANCING EVERY EVENING 
AERIAL TRAPEZE AND WIRE PERFORMANCE :: BANDS, BANDS, BANDS :: CALIFORNIA ANNUAL DAIRY EXHIBIT :: MAG- 
NIFICENT PARADES THROUGH THE PAVILION :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: SEE THE GREAT WHITE CITY 



Saturday, September 2d — Opening Electric Display in Evening; 
Band Concert: Address of Welcome. 

Monday, September 4th — Labor Day Celebration; United Labor 
Dance ; United Labor Parade. 

Tuesday, September 5th — Sacramento Valley Day; Ribbon Parade 
through Pavilion ; Judging Poultry Exhibits. 

N. B. — The Marvelous Baums each night give an aerial trapepze per- 
formance in dome of Pavilion. 



Wednesday, September 6th — San Joaquin Valley Day; Automobile 
Parade; Band Concert; Dancing. 

Thursday, September 7th — Governor's Day; Addresses and Music; 
Grand March ; Dancing. 

Friday, September 8th — Flag and Flag Pole Presentation ; Mystic 
Shriners' Parade. 

Saturday, September 9th — Admission Day Parade, 11 a. m. ; Electric 
Carnival Parade, 7:30 p. m. ; Open House for Everybody. 



■ ■1* W^ IW «^ >lll ll ■I^III X . 



AGRICULTURAL PARK PROGRAMME 



««i» un l a w 1 i^%ii m ■w m i m i »«i»'i»i i^<*»«» 



■■iwimiwm ii'iiii ■ ■■■■!■ ■ "ii Him 



Saturday, September 2d. 

Occident Stake, value $3910. 

Stallion Stake, pacing division, $400 added. 

2 :o9 Class Pace, $800. 

2:15 Class Trot, $700. 

Three Special Purses, Running. 

Each day in front of the grand stand "The Marvelous Baums," James 
and Alferetta, will give a half hour's bicycle performance on a half-inch 
wire cable suspended one hundred feet above the ground. 

Monday, September 4th. 

Three Special Purses, Running. 

Nevada Day — Bronco Busting, Roping and Tying Contests, Indian 
Races, etc. 

Tuesday, September 5th. 
Stallion Stake, trotting division, $600 added. 
2:13 Class Pace, $600. 
2:12 Class Trot, $700. 
Three Special Purses, Running. 



Wednesday, September 6th. 

2 :20 Class Pace, $600. 

2 130 Class Trot, $600. 

Three Special Purses, Running. 

Grand Parade of All Live Stock on Exhibition at 10 a. m. 

Thursday, September 7th. 
Governor's Day. 
Occident-Stanford Stake. 
2:18 Class Trot, $600. 
Three Special Purses, Running. 

Friday, September 8th. 
Stanford Stake, $300 added. 
2:18 Class Pace, $600. 
Free-for-All Trot, $800. 
Three Special Purses, Running. 
Grand Parade of Premium Stock at 10 a. m. 

Saturday, September 9th. 
2:25 Class Pace, $1500. 
2:24 Trot, $1500. 




I. J. L. Gillis. State Librarian 2. Jos. R. Knowland, Representative in Congress, Third District 3. U. S. Webb, Attorney General 4. J. B. Lauck, Adjutant General 



>> 



Dependable Beverages 






Old Bel-Air Whiskey 

Absolutely straight goods, 
distilled under improved 
methods in the best equipped 

distillery in Ky., by John G. 
Roach & Co., one of the 
oldest and most famous dis- 
tillers in the country. 



Yosemite Beer. 



The acme of the brewer's 
art; pure, palatable, nutritious. 
Bottled at the brewery where 
made, thus retaining all that 
delicious flavor and whole- 
someness, resulting from the 
scientific process of malting 
and brewing employed by the 
Enterprise Brewing Co. 



Capital : Mercantile : Company 

Importers, Wholesalers and Retailers of 
"DEPENDABLE BEVERAGES" 
Phones, Capital 775; Sunset Oak, 4297 



1014 8th Street, :: Sacramento, Cal. 



->> 




MY MOTTO' COURTESY AND PROMPT ATTENTION TO MY CUSTOMER S 

WM. TRUST 

728 K STREET 

Manufacturing Wholesaler and Retailer of Ice Creams, Ices, Etc. Families, Parlies and Weddings Sup- 
plied. The products of this establishment are manufactured on the premises under the personal direction 
of Mr. Wm. Trust. Our specialty is box candy, prices for which range from $1.00 for a 2 lb. box to 
$3.00 for a 6 lb. box. Mail orders have our very careful attention :::::::::::: 



L OAK PARK LL 

1 



Location 3 miles from business center of Sacramento. 
Reached by J, M, P, and G Street Cars. A most 
delightful car ride. Free high-class vaudeville mati- 
afternoons and two performances each evening. 



nee 



Toboggan, Merry-go- Round, Miniature Railway, Swings 
and everything to amuse the young and entertain the old. 

Do Not Fail to Visit Oak Park During Carnival Week 




PROGRAMME 




TUESDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 5th 

Ribbon Parade under auspices of the Sac- 
ramento Driving Club. 

The Parade will start from 13th and J at 8 o'clock, and proceed down 
J, passing the Official Grand Stand at the Plaza, to 2d street; over 2d to 
K; up K to 10th; thence over 10th to N; up N to 11th; from 11th and N 
the Parade will pass around the front of the Capitol to rear, thence down 
center of Park Grounds, passing through the Pavilion and disband on 
15th and N. 

The classes for competition are as follows: 

Tallyho's, 1st and 2d Prizes; Double Teams, 1st, 2d and 3d Prizes; 
Surreys, 1st, 2d and 3rd Prizes, Singles, 1st, 2d, 3rd, 4th and 5th Prizes; 
Tandems, 1st and 2d Prizes; Best decorated of any class — novelty, 1st and 
2d Prizes. F. E. Wright, Grand Marshal. 

WEDNESDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 6th 

Grand Automobile Ribbon Parade 

Entire line of march will be illuminated by thousands of incandes- 
cent lights, and brilliantly decorated with Native Sons Carnival Colors. 

Suitable trophies will be awarded the cars in the different classes 
presenting the neatest appearance. A special one will be given to the 
Automobile covering ^the longest distance specially for the occasion. 
Accompanied by two full bands of music the Parade will start at 7:30 p. m. 
at 12th and J streets. Down J, passing the Official Grand Stand at the 
Plaza, to 2d street; over 2d to K; up K to 10th; down 10th to N; up N to 
11th; from 11th and N the Parade will pass around the front of the 
Capitol to rear, then down center of Park Grounds, passing through the 
Pavilion and disband on 15th and N. h- S. Upson, Grand Marshal. 



FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 8th, 10:30 A. M. 

Sutter's Fort Exercises 

Selection, Band. 

Vocal Selection, Quartet, Mrs. Emma Coppersmith, Mrs. R. H. Haw- 
ley, R. T. Cohn and J. G. Genshlea. 

Presentation of Flagpole to State of California by Native Sons of 
Sacramento County. John Straub, Chairman Flagpole Committee. 

Presentation of Flag on behalf of Califia Parlor No. 22, N. D. G. W. 
Miss Mary L,. Woods, President Califia Parlor. 

Unfurling of Stars and Stripes by Alyce Monteverde, during which a 
quartet will sing the "Star Spangled Banner," the audience joining in 
the chorus. 

Acceptance on behalf of Sutter Fort Trustees, Hon. W. W. Greer. 

"American Hymn," Quartet. 

Presentation of Memorial Tablet by Grand Parlor, N. S. G. W. Hon. 
James L,. Gallagher, Grand President. 
Quartet, "American Hymn," 
Response on behalf of State of California, Gov. George C. Pardee. 

"America," Quartet, audience to join in chorus. 

FRIDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 8th 

Islam Temple Mystic Shriners Parade 

The Shriners of Sacramento will leave their headquarters, Masonic 
Temple, 6th and K, at 7 p. M., and proceed to the depot, down J street to 
receive their Illustrious Potentate, Geo. Filmer and their Uniformed Patrol. 

The Parade will start from the depot up second street to K; up K to 
10th; over 10th to J; down J to 7th; over 7th to L; down L to 6th; down 
6th to Old Pavilion. 

Committee in charge, Noble R. P. Burr, Chairman; Noble R. O. 
Kimbrough, Secretary; Noble J. M. Anderson; Noble E. W. Hale; Noble 
L. F. Breuner; Noble H. E. Yardley. 




W W> W w w 



Sketch of Grand Officers 



# # # # #i 

# # # # # 

# # # # # 



Charles Mortimer Belshaw was born at Fiddletown, Amador County, 
California, March i i. [86l ; educated in the public schools of San Fran- 
cisco, where he removed in 1865; in 1883 went to Antioch, Contra Costa 
County; elected member of the Assembly from Contra Costa County in 
1804; 're-elected in 1896 and in 1898; elected State Senator from the 
Eleventh District in 1900, and re-elected in 1904. 

Clarence E. Jarvis was born at lone in Amador County in 1869, Janu- 
ary 14th. Lived there for eleven years and then at that age went to 
Nevada, and worked as a vaquero on the Sutherland cattle ranch at 
Winnemucca, Nevada, for ten years. He then went to San Francisco and 
attended Heald's Business College, graduating in 1889. Then received 
a position as grader and shipper at Butchertown, South San Francisco, 
for the wholesale butcher firm of Welby & Judge. Here he became a 
charter member of South San Francisco Parlor, No. 157, N. S. G. W. 
When he left this position he went to Tone and took a withdrawal card 
and placed same in lone Parlor, No. 33. He left lone and went to Sut- 
ter Creek, where he placed his card again in Amador Parlor, No. 17, 
X. S. G. YY. Has been an active member for sixteen years. Mr. Jarvis 
was elected Grand Trustee at Bakersfield in 1903. In 1904 he went to 
St. Louis on the N. S. G. W. excursion and took an active part in the 
Admission Day Celebration there on California Day (September 9, 1904). 
He was re-elected Grand Trustee at Monterey this year (1905). In 
Sutter Creek he has conducted successfully the Amador County Steam 
Laundry for nine years, in which he owns a one-half interest. 

Thomas Monahan was born in San Jose, California, July 4, 1866. He 
has been a member of San Jose Parlor, No. 22, for the last sixteen years. 
Brother Monahan has been honored with all the offices in the gift of 
his parlor, passing successfully through all the chairs, occupying that of 
President in 1894. Subsequent to this he was honored with the office of 
District Deputy Grand President, serving under Grand President Con- 
ley, his district comprising four parlors in San Francisco. 

He has served on the Joint Board of Hall Trustees of his Parlor for 
six years, and likewise on all important committees, notable among 
them the 1894 9th of September Committee, where Brother Monahan's 
hard work was largely instrumental in raising the funds which enabled 
the San Jose Parlors to bring to a most successful issue one of the largest 
celebrations in the history of the Order. 

That Brother Monahan's zeal for the Order has not lagged in the in- 
tervening years is shown by the fact that he was Chairman of the com- 
mittee having in charge of the grand ball at the Hotel Vendome, ten- 



dered to the Native Daughters on the occasion of their last Grand Par- 
lor in San Jose. This ball the delegates united in declaring one of the 
most enjoyable they had ever attended, and was pronounced by the press 
as one of the greatest social events in the histor)^ of San Jose. This too, 
was accomplished largely through the efforts of Brother Monahan, with- 
out expense to the Parlors, and with a balance remaining on hand to be 
devoted toward defraying part of the expenses of the Parlors to the 
Sacramento celebration. 

Brother Monahan has attended seven Grand Parlors previous to the 
one at Monterey, where he was honored with the office of Grand Trustee. 

For the past fifteen years he has been connected with the San Jose 
Postoffice and his genial disposition has won for him *a host of friends 
outside the Order, who wish him continued honors and success, both 
in the Order and his chosen field of work. 

John T. Skelton, President of the Board of Education, was born and 
raised in the city of Sacramento, where early in life he displayed those 
qualities which endeared him to the hearts of his friends and stamped him 
as a leader of men. 

A product of our public schools, he passed through all the grades with 
honor, after which he entered the employment of the Southern Pacific 
freight office, where by his energy and close attention to business he rose 
rapidly to a position of responsibility. It was while filling this position 
of trust that his abilities came to the notice of the General Agent of the 
Denver and Rio Grande Railway — ever on the lookout for bright and 
active men, proffered him the position of local agent, which for the 
past five years he has filled with credit to himself and the entire satis- 
faction of his employers. 

He early identified himself with the organization of the Native Sons, 
joining Sunset Parlor, whose members delighted to honor him, passing 
through all the chairs, including that of President of the Parlor ; he is at 
the present writing Grand Marshal of the entire order. 

As an evidence of his popularity it may be cited that when pressed to 
make the race for School Director he declined, pleading business en- 
gagements, but his friends would not listen to his refusal and elected 
him by the largest majority ever secured in his district for that or any 
other office. Upon the retirement of Mr. Johnson he was unanimously 
chosen President, though the youngest member of the board. 

His honors have come to him unsought, and being in the prime of life, 
is only on the threshold of his career, should he elect to follow the path 
which he has carefully mapped out for himself. 




1 . James L. Gallagher, Crand President 

2. C. E McLaughlin. Past President 

3. Walter D. Wagner, Grand First Vice-President 

4. M, P. Dooling, Grand Second Vice-President 



5. Charles L. Belshaw, Grand Third Vice-President 

6. Chas. H. Turner, Grand Secretary 

7. John T. Skelton, Grand Marshal 
John E. McDougald, Grand Treasurer 



9, Joseph R. Knowland, Grand Trustee 

10. Daniel A. Ryan, Grand Trustee 

11. H. C. Lichenberger, Grand Trustee 



1 3. Geo. W. Colgan, Grand Inside Sentinel 

1 4. Geo. L. Farmer. Grand Outside Sentinel 

15. W. R. Porter, Grand Trustee 



— 



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TREADWELL 

WHISKY 

THE BEST EVER' 

.TREADWELL &CO.SOLE PROP. 



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1 SACRAMENTO STREET, :: SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



rv::5S> 



THE WELD 

THxrmx& 




P 
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BARER ®L HAMILTON, 

Sole Agents 



Whites Tent and Awning Co. 

Manufacturers of Tents, Awnings and Canvas Covers. Window 
Awnings for Residences a Specialty. 



Tents for Sale 

© 

Canopies, Bags and 

Shacks of all kinds 

© 

Up-to-Date Crank 

Awnings for 

Stores 




Tents on hand for 

rent at all times 

© 

Duck and Canvas 

work of every 

description 

© 

Phone Sunset Vale 

6371 



1024 Sixth Street, :: :: :: :: :: Sacramento, Cal. 

Formerly for twelve years Proprietor San Jose Tent and Awning Co. 



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J. EMMET HAYDEN 



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16 Market St., 

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1. Ed. E Reese, Marshal 

2. L. B. Wilson, 1st Vice-President 

3. Ed. H. Cox, Jr., 2d Vice-President 



4. Geo. Sherman, Treasurer 

5. F. H. Conn, Financial Secretary 

6. B. E. Bryan, President 



7. Fred. J. Johns, Recording Secretary 

8. Sherman F. Coster, Inside Sentinel 

9. Victor Kohler, 3d Vice-President 



10. Albert Bates, Junior Past President 
1 I. Fred W. Carey, Outside Sentinel 




Write for Illustrated Catalog 
PACIFIC COAST DEPOT 

86-88 First Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



E. E. DRAKE, Manager 



All Hand Work, no Machinery. Get more wear out of 
your Shoes by having them repaired at the 

ACME SHOE SHOP 

Gent's nailed half soled, 50c. Ladies nailed half soled, 35c 

Gents' hand-sewed half soled, 75c. Ladies' hand-sewed 

half soled, 50c. Rubber heels, 50c 

O'Sullivan's rubber heels, 60c. 

A. R. MAMMEN, \0\7j4 J STREET 



THE CABIN 

704 K STREET 
Schlitz, The Beer 

THAT MADE 

Milwaukee Famous 

ON DRAUGHT 

Fine Liquors and Cigars, Sandwiches and 
Cold Meats 

LOUIS SCHINDLER, PROPRIETOR 



Go to 1 1 09 8th Street for the w 
§| Lucas Tamales, Enchiladas, Beans jp> 
and Chicken Spanish. m> 

Phones, Capital 399 3B. Sunset Vale 5352 ffi 



■■- -7; •■■ 



m 



.-,/VC 



ffi 



THE SPORT OF KINGS 

BOWLING 

One of the few Regulation Alleys on the Coast 

1002 K Street. W. W. Drullinger, Proprietor 

The personal attention of Mr. Drullinger is given to patrons 
Alley open Evenings 




1. B. H. Dean, Past President Athens Parlor, No. 195 and.D. D. G. P., Alameda Co. 

2. John J. Allen. District Attorney, Past President Oakland Parlor 

3. J. J. Burke, Athens Parlor 

4. A. H. Breed. Oakland Parlor 



PROMINENT NATIVE SONS OF OAKLAND, CAL. 

5. Jos. W. Kramm, Trustee Piedmont Parlor. No. 120 

6. Dr. W. J. Smyth 

7. H. P. Dalton, Assessor, Alameda County 

8. J. E. McElroy, City Attorney, Oakland 



9. George E. DeGolia 

10. J. J. McElroy, Past President Piedmont Parlor. No. 120 

11. E. F. Holland 

12. W. H. L. Hynes 



13. E. F. ^Garrison, Chief Deputy Citv A«y*snr's Office. Rer anrl Fin S, f ,>ipr,,Ail.. n .P„U.. rk^_^XkL_£— ■— L— -^— 



■■ 



BREWERS' HOME 



ALBERT HUELSMAN 

PROPRIETOR 



FINE WINES, LIQUORS AND CiGARS 



T1VOLI.-. BAGATELLE 



1118 J Street, : Sacramento 



ELLIS JONES 
WM. JONES 



Sunset Phone Vale 8442 
Capita] Phone 848 



THE BALDWIN 



ARCHIE BUELL 



AGENTS FOR SAMUELS' MINERAL WATER 



OUR SPECIALTY: BONDED WHISKEY 



WELCOME N. S. G. W. 

TO thf 

Gilt Edge Saloon 

FOR A FINE GLASS OF BEER OR PORTER 

JACOB GRUHLER 
1014 J STREET, - SACRAMENTO, CAL. 



NEW 



Wm. Tell Hotel 



2>eutfd)c£ 




(Saft&au* 



916 7th Street, Bet. I and J, Sacramento 



JOHN WUNDER 

PROPRIETOR 



Electric Cars pass the House every five minutes 
CAPITAL TELEPHONE 835 



812 to 816 J Street, 



Sacramento, Cal. 



BAUER'S 



WET GOODS. : : THE GOOD KIND 






CHAS. F. BAUER 
PROPRIETOR 



1020 FOURTH STREET 



Sacramento, : : California 




FREDDIE WALKER 
BILLIE BURNS 

WINES 

LIQUORS 

CIGARS 

225 K STREET 

Sacramento 



CASTLE ROCK SALOON 



MARTIN ALBER 

PROPRIETOR 



Capital Telephone 873 



l/'MO I""' I J-\ C<. CORNER OAK AVENUE 

1018 hlghth St., SACRAMENTO 




SACRAMENTO COUNTY OFFICIALS 

Joseph W. Hughes. Judge of the Superior Court 2. E, C. Hart, Judge of the Superior Court 3. Peter J. Shields, Judge of the Superior Court 

4. Arthur M. Seymour, District Attorney 5. David Reese, Sheriff 






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One of Sacramento's roost prominent citizens FRANK RUHSTALLER President ofthe Fort Sutter National Bank 



.1 IV QESSNI R 



CHRIS. MERZ 



Capital Phone 353. 2 Hells 
Sunset, Vale 956 



ORPHEUM EXCHANGE 



OPPOSITE CLUNIE 
THEATRE 



MERZ & GESSNER, 
Proprietors 



The Best of Everything 



806 k: street 

SACRAMENTO 



Telephone 

CAPITAL 
824- 



Currier 

Rail 

Saloon 

HANS GRABER 



914 1\ Street 



Sacramento 




•PHONES: 

SUNSET, OAK 7171 

CAPITAL 955 




F. KUCHLER 



J STUESSV 



Cbe Cdclcome 



EVERYTHING FIRST-CLASS 



700 K STREET 
Opposite Postoffice SACRAMENTO 



W. F. BELLMER 



EO. M. ARNOLD 



Sainter 



** 



525 K STREET 



SACRAMENTO 



CAPITAL PHONE 517 



SUNSET, VALE 7401 



The Coolest Saloon 
in Town 



THE BRANCH 



GENE MULVEY *i§ B1LLIE ALVORD 



927 K Street 



Sacramento, Cal. 



Kentucky Bourbon and Rye 
Whiskies a Specialty 



SETH 

GAINSLEY'S 

SAMPLE 

ROOMS 



Finest Brands of Wines, Liquors and Cigars 

Coldest and Sharpest Steam 

and Lager Beer in Town 

NearS. P. Depot 
S.W. COR. SECOND AND I STREETS, SACRAMENTO, CAL. 











SACRAMENTO COUNTY OFFICIALS 

1. J. C. Boyd, County, Surveyor 3. R. T. Cohn, County Recorder 5. A. A. Merkeley, County License and Tax Collector 

2. W. F. Gormley, County Coroner 4. T. H. Berkey, County Assessor 6. W. B. Hamilton, County Clerk 



7. L. P. Williams, County Auditor 

8. B. F. Howard, County Supl. of Schools 




Phone : Sunset Oak 4676 



THE BAND 
SALOON 

J. ABRAM, Proprietor 
Headquarters for Native Sons 



1 1 00 J St., Sacramento 



\OAHo 




Sunset Vale 206 



Cepltal 141 



*Urk 



FresH and Corned 
Meats, Hams, Lard, 
Bacon and Sausages 
of all Rinds. J& J& 

1017 6tH ST. Sacramento 



r. F. DOOLEY, Proprietor 



W. W. RICH, Caterer 



Bnnbg a f>al0fltt 









Headquarters for 


Native Sons 







3mportrri HKiwh anr) ICiqunrs 

OPEN ALL NIGHT 

607 K Street, - - - Sacramento, Cal. 



Finest Wines, Liquors, Cigars 
Constantly on Hand 



A Good Lunch Always 
to be Pound 



CAPITAL PHONE 947 



(SamhrtmtB If all 



A. BUERGI, Proprietor 



RUHSTALLER'S GILT EDGE 
AND BUFFALO NEW BREW 
ON DRAUGHT ^ ^ ^ V* ^ 



620 K Street 



Sacramento, Cal. 



JIM LANAGAN 
BILL FOUSE 



Capital 'Phone 332 
Sunset, Vale 391 



JIMS SALOON 

Choice Wines, Liquors and Cigars 
Steam and Lager Beer a Specialty 

1 023 Third Street Sacramento, Cal. 




OUR MOTTO : 
'Everything First-class' 



Merchants 
Lunch 
11:30 
To 1:30 



WW. ELLSWORTH, 
Proprietor 



66 



99 



ARLINGTON 

601 K STREET 

"DEL PASO" 

613 K STREET 



HANLON'S ^iSSk^g 



^ 



! 



VI 



^ 




* 



i 



3 



& 



The Big Cafe, Sacramento 




CITY OFFICIALS OF SACRAMENTO 

Wm. j. HasseH. Mayor 2. W. D. Comstock, Auditor and Assessor 3. John C. March. City Justice 4. S. Luke Howe, City Attorney 5. Cha, M. P,od g er. City Treasurer 6. EliasQ 






E}/§^<MP 




"THE SWELL SHOP' 



STRAUB 



THE TAILOR 



I. O. O. F. 
907 K St., Sacramento, Cal. 



Lei the "Swell Shop" count you as one of its many satisfied customers. It will hold your patronage, 
if stylish clothes, right prices, and excellent treatment and service is what you wish ::::::: 






Sunset Oak 9537 



Capital 260 2B 



SCHAAPS .-. CAFE 




516 K Street, 



Albert Schaap, Prop'r 

J. F. WHITE 
AL. HOOPER 
Caterers 



Steam and Lager Beer a 
Specialty 

Everything New and First-Class 



Sacramento, Cal. 



WAISTS, 

CORSETS 

Etc. 




721 K Street 

Sacramento, Cal. 






J 




€W^4€Wl & 



The Grandest Cafe in the West. Ground Floor. Perfect 

Ventilation. Will open early in September 

on old Tivoli Opera House Site 



30 Eddy Street, San Francisco, Cal. 




For well made and 
proper fitting 
clothes see 

BOCK 



528 J STREET 



SACRAMENTO, CAL. 




I. Frank Maltison 



STATE BOARD OF EQUALIZATION 
2. Richard H. Beamer 3. Alexander Brown 



4. William H. Alford 



NATIVE SONS AND DAUGHTERS 










DO NOT FAIL TO TAKE A RIDE ON THE TOBOGGAN SLIDE AT OAK PARK, SACRAMENTO, CAL. 

ALL STREET CARS LEAD TO OAK PARK :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: SINGLE RIDE 5 CENTS; 6 RIDES 23 CENTS 










programme: 




First division will form on Fourth street, left resting on M. 

Second division will form on Fourth street, right resting on M 

Third division will form on Fifth street, left resting on M. 

Fourth division will form on Fifth street, right resting on M. 

Fifth division will form on Sixth street, left resting on M. 

Sixth division will form on Sixth street, right resting on M. 

Seventh division will form on Seventh street, left resting on M. 

Eighth division will form on Seventh street, right resting on M. 

Ninth division will form on Eighth street, left resting on M. 

Route of Parade — Starts promptly at 10:30 a. m. at Fourth and M. 
Up M to Tenth ; over Tenth to K, and down K street to Second ; over 
Second to J and up J street to Sixteenth, countermarching before the 
official reviewing stand on Plaza, Tenth and J, and disbanding at Tenth 
and K. Grand Marshal, JOHN T. SKELTON. 

Chief Aides — Scott F. Ennis and Joseph E. Green. 

Principal Guides — Dr. T. J. Cox and J. L. Richards. 

Division Marshals — First Division, W. E. O'Connor of Stockton. Sec- 
ond Division, F. Monahan of San Francisco. Third Division, J. A. Pre- 
dom of Auburn. Fourth Division, Mark Noon of San Francisco. Fifth 
Division, P. J. Curtis of San Francisco. Sixth Division, F. T. Barnett 
of Oakland. Seventh Division, A. B. Langford of San Jose. Eighth 
Division, P. K. Bradford of Elk Grove. Ninth Division, E. E. Todd 
of Redding. 

Division Aides— Carl Strobel, L. B. Keller, W. W. Greer, A. Heilbron, 
James H. Hayes, James Leitch, L. W. Nickel, E. G. Messner, Malcolm 
Glenn, L. T. Hinsdale, Edward Harvey, G. S. Wheeler, Dr. E. J. Weldon, 
j. C. Boyd", S. Pope, G. E. Hook, George L. Litchhardt, J. W. Haley. 

Honorary Aides — J. F. Linehan, California Parlor, No. 1. Dr. J. L. 
Sullivan, Marysville Parlor, No. 6. George Hogan, Stockton Parlor, 
No. 7. Frank Atkins, Oroville Parlor, No. 8. James O'Gara, Pacific 
Parlor, No. 10, O. C. P. Goodspeed, Chico Parlor, No. 21. J. M. Mc- 
Kierman, San Jose Parlor, No. 22. Colonel L. W. Juilliard, Santa Rosa 
Parlor, No. 28. H. F. Suhr, Golden Gate Parlor, No. 29. Dr. J. L. Smith, 
^Yoodland Parlor, No. 30. D. B. Bowley, Mission Parlor, No. 38. 
L. L. Kimerer, Rainbow Parlor, No. 40. Frank Marini, San Francisco 
Parlor, No. 49. J. J. Greely, El Dorado Parlor, No. 52. Walter Sink, St. 
Helena Parlor, No. 53. Gilbert Richards, Hydraulic Parlor, No. 56. 
W. T. Crosby, Auburn Parlor, No. 59. F. M. Silva, Napa Parlor, No. 62. 
J. J. Bouquier, Silver Star, Parlor, No. 63. Ernest Weyand, Colusa Par- 
lor, No. 69. Dr. Ed. McCabe, Watsonville Parlor, No. 65. John Haman, 
Rincon Parlor, No. 72. B. J. Flood, Stanford Parlor, No. j6. Grant Hal- 
liday, Vallejo Parlor, No. 77. B. E. Kell, Palo Alto Parlor, No. 82. J. T. 



Harms, Yerba Buena Parlor, No. 84. S. W. Kellett, Calistoga Parlor, 
No. 86. E. M. Eisfelder, Bay City Parlor, No. 104. W. A. Granfield, 
Niantic Parlor, No. 105. F. E. Gilman, National Parlor, No. 118. George 
A, Damon, Piedmont Parlor, No. 120. Bart Mahoney, Hesperean Parlor, 
No. 137. H. Litchenstein, Alcatraz Parlor, No. 145. Ed Bleyman, 
Halcyon Parlor, No. 146. V. C. Snelling, McCloud Parlor, No. 149. 
C. A. Jacoby, Brooklyn Parlor, No. 151. L. Nounemann, South San 
Francisco Parlor, No. 157. T. A. Fox, Sequoia Parlor, No. 160. H. D. 
Melvin, Observator Parlor, No. 177. F. D. McArdle, Precita Parlor, 
No. 187. Julius Eppstein, Olympus Parlor, No. 189. C. A. Son, Presidio 
Parlor, No. 194. Dr. W. J. Smith, Athens Parlor, No. 195. J. M. Sauter, 
Program for Literary Exercises New Pavilion, Saturday, September 

9th, 2 130 p. m. 

Patriotic Airs, ----- s . - Orchestra 

Opening Remarks, ------ Hon. R. T. Devlin 

(Sacramento Parlor, No. 3, N. S G. W.) 
Quartet ... ... " Viva 1' America" 

Mrs. J. A. Moynihan, Mrs. Win. Murcell, R. T. Cohn, W. E. M. Beardslee 

Miss Lizzie M. Griffin, Accompanist 

Address, .-..-.. Hon James L. Gallagher 

Grand President Native Sons of the Golden West 

Quartet, "Forty-Nine" 

By Leila France McDermott. Words by Joaquin Miller 
Oration, -------- Judge T. J. Lennon 

Twin Peaks Parlor, No. 214, N. S. G. W., San Francisco 
N. S. G. W. Closing Ode, ------- Audience 

Air, "America." 
March, ......... Orchestra 

Saturday Evening, September 9th, Electrical Carnival Parade. 

Formation of parade : 

First division will form on Eighetenth street, right resting on J. 

Second division will form on Seventeenth street, right resting on J. 

Procession will start promptly at 7 130 p. m. at Eighteenth and J streets, 
and proceed down J street to Second ; over Second to K, and up K street 
tc Tenth, and over Tenth to Q street, and countermarch, disbanding at 
Tenth and L. 

Grand Marshal— COLONEL H. I. SEYMOUR. 

Chief of Staff— MAJOR F. L. MARTIN. 

Aids to Grand Marshal — J. F. Sherburn, C. E. Mahoney, William 
Sayre, J. H. Miller, Jr., Frank Edinger, Dr. T. J. Cox. 

Division Marshal, Southern Pacific Shops — E. H. Whyte. 

Aides— Charles H. Clark. J. T. Richards, W. M. Hallanan, H. W. 
Leonard, J. W. Pippitt. 

Organized Labor Division Marshal — J. Noonan. 

Aides — A. J. Hinton, A. J. Stevenson. H. Eugene, D. W. Milne. 




WILLIAM DEVLIN 
Trustee Sutter's Fort 




G. W. VICE 
Trustee Sutter's Fort 





W. W GREER 
President Board of Sutter's Fort Trustees 





MRS. ARIANA STIRLING 
Grand President N. D. G. W. 



W. N. LAMPHREY, 
Trustee Sutter's Fort. 



C. E. MAHONEY 

Publisher Souvenir Program. N. S. G. W. Celebraiton 







Charles H. Spear 
President of State Harbor Commissioners 



A. C. Irwin 

President R. R. Commissioners 



Duncan E. McKinlay 
Congressman 2d District 



John D. Mackenzie 
Harbor Commissioner 







Frank D. Ryan 
Past Grand President, N. S. G. W. Commissioner Public Works 



John T. Skelton 
Grand Marshal N. S. G. W. Celebration. 1905 



Ed. H. Kraus 
Chairman Gen. Committee, N. S. G. W. Celebration. 1905 



Carl T. Granz 
P. P. Stanford Parlor, No. 76 



CAPITAL PHONE 571 



the Pullman 



SCANDINAVIAN 
HEADQUARTERS 



3 ETERSON & JOHNSON 

PROPRIETORS 



QAC IX STREET 
J\JJ l\> SACRAMENTO 



sunset Phone Vale 8% 



Capital Phone 4 



SCOTT, LYMAN & STACK 

(INCORPORATED) 

PLUMBING AND ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS 
GAS AND ELECTRIC FIXTURES 
STEAM AND HOT WATER HEATING 

SACRAMENTO 



419-421 J Street 



CALIFORNIA 






CUTS IN THIS PROGRAMME 

== WERE PREPARED BY THE ===== 

YOSEMITE ENGRAVING CO. 

24 MONTGOMERY ST., SAN FRANCISCO 

W. R. NEVILLE, PROP 1 R . 






I. CARLAW 



CARL AW BROS., 

SACRAMENTO GRANITE 
AND MARBLE WORKS 



A. CARLAW 



DIRECT IMPORTERS OF 



Scotch and all Eastern Granites. Contractors for all Kinds of Building Stone Work 

Branch Office at Warerooms, 1 Oth and Y Sts. Quarries at Loomis, Placer County 

Sacramento COR. 1 Oth and R STREETS ..California 



Sunset Vale 1611 



Capital 145 



SILLER BROS. 



CONTRACTORS 
AND BUILDERS 



OFFICE AND MILLS 



1614 THIRTEENTH STREET 



SACRAMENTO, 



CALIFORNIA. 



CHAS. FRANK 

REPRESENTING M I TCH ALU SC H K E 

DEALERS IN 

FINE CIGARS and TOBACCO 



THE PHOTOGRAPHS 

IN THIS PROGRAMME WERE 
OBTAINED THROUGH THE 
COURTESY OF :: :: :: :: :: 

HODSON and BUSHNELL 

PHOTOGRAPHERS 




Ed. Rock, Supervisor, Niactic Parlor, No. 105 2. John J. Van Nosirand, Justice of ihe Peace, S. F., P. P. Stanford Parlor No. 76 3. Lewis F. Byington. Past Grand President N. S G. W., District Attorney City and County of S. F. 

4. T. I. Fitzpatrick. Warrant Clerk Dislrict Attorney's Office 5, J. H. Scott Tax Collector 6. Edmund Gojchaux. Recorder, P. P. Presidio Parlor 7. Peter J. Curtis, Sheriff 

A. B. Lawson, Army and Navy Parlor, N. S. G. W., Justice of the Peace 9. Frank Maestretti. Cal. Parlor, Board of Public Works 10. T. B, W. Leland, Coroner II. E. E. Schmitz Mayor 12. John J. Grief. County Clerk 

13. F. J. Murasky, P. P. Olympia, No. 169. Judge of the Superior Court 14. Thos. F. Egan, Rican Parlor. No. 72, Board of Public Works I 5. W. H. Langdon. Pacific Parlor. No. 10, Supt,. Public Schools 

16. E. Aigeltinger. Board of Public Work 17. Washing-on Dodge, Assessor 18. J. M. Hanley. Assistant District Attorney 19. Alfred J. Fritz, Stanford Parlor, No. 76, Judge of the Police Court 



Population: 1000 




COLFAX, PLACER COUNTY 



Altitude: 2400 Ft. 




Railroad facilities are 
unexcelled, there being 
eighteen passenger trains 
arriving and departing 
every- day .... 

Climate perfect; above 
the fog and below the 
snow 

Great Fruit Belt, both 
in orchards and vineyards. 

Grapes and Pears ex- 
cel in flavor, size and 
quality; bear shipping 
best for Eastern points. 

Soil of exceptional 
fertility 

Colfax is the most 
easterly station in Califor- 
nia which raises fruit 
successfully 





Fruit is not only of 
superior quality in this 
section, but it is from one 
to five days nearer the 
market than points west or 
south of Colfax. 

Fruit shipped from 
here avoids the long haul 
through the hot valleys. 

Great health resort for 
those troubled with as- 
thma, weak lungs and 
kindred troubles. 

Most marvelous 
scenery in the Sierras to 
be seen from this locality. 

Miles of the most 
beautiful driveways in 
California, pass in through 
forests of lofty pines, 
through beautiful valleys, 
over mountains and crags 



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: Situated 54 Miles Northeast from Sacramento : 



HEADQUARTERS 
NATIVE DAUGHTfRS. 



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